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The 1 930 
TOWER 












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E. Christen sen 
Editor 

K. RlGGS 

Business Manager 




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n is *,t£ 



The 1930 
TOWER 

A student record of a college 

year. 

Published by 

The Junior Class of 

The Stout Institute 

Menomonie, Wisconsin 




: Fx 












Foreword 

Books — Strangers to some, 
mere acquaintances to others, 
inseparable companions to an 
appreciative few. A stranger 
has slight effect on the ex- 
periences we value; a mere 
acquaintance contributes lit- 
tle to the wealth in our store- 
house of memories; but an in- 
separable friend shares whole- 
heartedly our life of every 
day. 

May this book be true 
friend and companion, shar- 
ing with you, in future years, 
the memory of your college 
days. 








v 






\ 



\ ■ 






\ 









Contents 

The College 
Scenery 

Faculty 

Classes 

College Life 

Organizations 

Athletics 

Features 

Calendar 

Snaps 

Menomonie 




j Mimtmm 





*^J 



Dedication 

A man with a vision — of 
men and women — their lives 
guided by the spirit of learn- 
ing, industry, skill, and hon- 
or — lives on today in our 
midst. He lives, not merely 
in name, but in mankind 
whom he served. To the ever 
fuller fruition of the ideals 
of James H. Stout, the 
founder of The Stout In- 
stitute, we dedicate this 
Tower of nineteen hundred 
and thirty. 




fflTM Ik 

it s a s r 




- 



y 




A- 



(BISCj 











James H. Stout 



o 



ALMA MATER 

N the banks of Lake Menomin 

Stands our Alma Mater true, 

With tower high and brilliant "S"; 

For her we'll dare and do. 

We'll sing her praises many. 

We'll glorify her name, 

And on throughout the years of time, 

Our love for Stout proclaim. 






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r O W KH 19 3 



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Personality of the Individual 

THERE isn't any question about it. As the years pass, school work changes 
to better prepare students to meet life's responsibilities which in turn, through 
constant changes, are becoming more and more complex. 

New demands compel new standards of efficiency which must be attained 
through more expert guidance in curricula and the correlation of content to meet 
contemporary vocational demands. Leaders in Education must as surely be able 
to read the teaching nerds of the future as it is neeess;iry fo* the manager of in- 
dustry to predict the direction and character of development in Ins field. 

Those are essentials in the professional and in the business relations of human 
activity. Hut more important than any of these considerations is the personality 
of the individual. That must not be overlooked in any study of the elements of 
success. The study of his own conduct in its relation to Ins associates and to the 
area in which he is working has so much to do with the determination of the value 
of all preparation leading up to the present in his experience, that it should be made 
a daily consideration. 

To fit in, to be appreciated, to be esteemed, depends more upon personality 
than upon the degree of preparation. Personality can be improved and developed 
and enriched as certainly and as definitely as any other of the worthwhile virtues. 

Burton Edsel Nelson, President 



Pag* rJ 



to n t; R l 9 3 o 



Id in !'., Mh ii ueu 

titan. Srhool of Home 

!■'.'• onomiea 



Mi in i. M. Pe« E 

History, English, Dean 
of Men 



I I II. DA BaLKRUD 

Physical Education for 

Women 



Ahtiu-r G. Bruwn 
F,rl unit inn 



Hi -th E. BcLL 

Secretary 



Vuci M, Buioom 

Cafeteria Management 




Cl.VIlK A. BflWJfAS 

than. Srhnol of Indus- 
trial Kihicat'um 



I'm n v M. Bach man" 
Biological Science 



f i mi v I .niisi Biirc-.iiTiiy 

Home Economics 
/education 



Mary Lonst; Hit has as 
Foods 



Jri.ifs Bl.OM, m, n. 
College Medical 

Hxiimhn f 



Earl BLRhiuOR 
// ygii u< unit Athletic* 



jgf.nni 

r' -J- _-_ - 




Po«<r /9 



T tiW ER 1 9X 



( iFinnrriE L. C'aij.aiian- 
Englitk 



Mahgarkt W. ( mi i-i: 
Nutrition 



Waltei B. Davooh 

Stirlul Science 



Jokh Favu.i.k. .In. 
s-irh'l Science 




Hryahu M. Fl NK 

IlilnhU'.-* Mr'll'Ofl 



II. F. G4N>i» 

/"'■j )!• r!,ir,,ii-f. Electri- 
cal Work, 81 ■ 




fiu%*«*. ^, *^. 



.Per* c » 



Lu.r.iAN Carson 
R*lnt,<i Art* 



Fred I.- (Vhkw 

[iithisfriril Erhirtitinn 



Ja.mi.s If, Kahly 

JrrhHtrinr<ii Drawing 



], II. I IAN H, FlMtjIi I I I 

Library . tdminittratlon 



\\ M \ May G I R I 

Bontt Economics 

Education 



Damki, Gkkzh 

W-irhiiri l>rnfthi>l 



TOWER I 9 



II. M. Hans; n 

. Idvaneed Woodworl 



Lilliax Jeteb 
Clothing and Related . trl 



FXOTD KlETIt 

al Metal*. Sheet 
fatal 



'In mini rn 



Many I. McFaddck 
Education 



II. C. Mil v[. 
Uaehint Shop Praeti, 
Foundry Work, 
Patternmakino 




C. W. II AGUE 

Printing 



Violet M. Hassles 
Public dptaking, Bngliih 



Thomas W. Juhjjhtojj 

W mid turning. Sheet 
Metal 



Ii\v I". Khan/.imIF 

Auto Mi -rluinic*. Radio, 

I! mm Merlin nice 



Mary M. McCalmoxt 

' In mill I'll 



Mehna M. .Miller 
Biological Science 




7 o rr e h i 9 .9 



Mamie Russell Mut2 
Rtlated Ari 



(ii:RTHim; M. O'BWH n 
fo •li.tlrar 



Grace M. Pbxce 
Vocational Home Ern- 

rnnuir.' Eil iintthni 



Helen Sabchet 

English 



Hki.kn Stavkhiock. 
Stenographer 



K. Faith Stray hi 
Ho in t .i'l m in iff ratio n 




"> «■ 




Paul C. Nelsox 

Ell- till lit." ill Wll'llllCirrk, 
CtWpt III r II. H'nmi tin i.--li in ri 



Sylvester Pattltjs 
Coaching 



Hubert Bhi CE Antrim 
.hnininnt Librarian 



IIki.es C. Smith 
lor of Purser i) 
School 



Myrtle Strand 
.hnittanl Librarian 



F, E, 'JYstison 

Math&maMct, Science, 
Horn i Httcka*4ct 



Page 22 



r o w i: r 10 ;i o 



Li:tty K. WAUB 

Some Bconom{c$ 

Eil unit inn 



R. L. Welch 
Vocational Industrial 

Education 



Gback M. Dow 
Dirt r tar of Hall* and 

Iliill.vinrf 




Hazel Vax Nebs 



Clare Marie Waxoejt 
College Nurse 



Clara Ymm 
,S7i ' li'ii) nifihir 



^rS&*arff®l 



font n 




T O W /; K 1 9 3 



The Marshes 



I've traveled through the mountain's haze 

And o'er the singing sea. 

I've traveled o'er many a mile of endless plain. 

But I'«l leave all these places 

With the very best of graces, 

If I could have my marshes hack again. 

For there's something in the marshes, 

And it seems to call and thrall me, 

No matter where my footsteps chance to roam. 

There's the salty breeze that's stinging 

And the long marsh grass that's whining. 

And all that means hut one thing 

And that's Home. 



With the moonlight nn the river. 

Making marshes quake and quiver. 

And the tide swell softly lapping on ymir hoat. 

Vim forget your haste and hurry. 

Vim forget your care and worry. 

And all yiiii want to do is just to float. 

Just to float en through the passes, 

'Tween the long and bladelike grasses, 

And at night-time hear the sea-gull scream above. 

Just to Bee all nature waking. 

At the time the young day's breaking. 

Wakes a feeling in your heart that's kin to love. 

Tin re the tired, sick, and weary find a comfort for their souls; 

Tiny live a life they've never known before 

Just to have the marshes' feeling 

Softly, quietly, o'er me stealing, 

Would be wealth enough for me, 

Though I be poor. 



i' _ ' ^'t 




I may travel to the cities of the countries near and far, 
And perhaps along life's highway I may stray. 
But when I'm weak and weary 

Anil my whole outlook is dreary. 

I'll come hack to my marshes, 
There to stay. 

— Louise Whitehurst '30 



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Honors in Scholarship for 1929 

AT Commencement time eight students were the recipients of college honors. 
The Eichelberger Scholarships were awarded t<> two men and to two women 
of the Junior class on the basis of scholarship, personality, future possibil- 
ities, social attitude, and value t<> the school. Ruth Dodge, Henrietta Sievert, Hil- 
bert Wyatt. and Charles Strong each received the award of one hundred dollars. 

The custom initiated in 1928 oi giving honors to the two Freshmen ami the 
two Sophomores who ranked highest in scholarship in their respective classes was 
again observed. Those who were honored thus were Doris Henry and Carl Beinert 
of the Freshman class and Eleanor Overby and Ernest Christensen of the Sopho- 
more class. 










* for 






Pate /o 






i«m\\\\ii \\\iu//mm% 



SENIORS 



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^ 



Seniors 



THOUGH we are leaving, we are not forgetting The Stout Institute; it will 
be <>ur responsibility to be worthy of our Alma Mater and to prov< that her 
teaching has not bei n in vain. This responsibility! too, will be ours, to show 
our loyalty to our college by forwarding her interests and making her better 

known. 

W hen graduation days bring to a close our college career, which to u> has 
;.n era of happiness and friendship, contentment and joy, we as the Senior Class 
of The Stout Institute will not have ended our intimate associations. Though we 
ma\ be separated by miles of spa .U our paths may reach forth to varied 

horizons, that bond that held us in close companionship as students together, will 
not have perished, but will continue to bring to us more joys in frequent and happy 
reminiscences of the days spent in our Alma Mater. 

" — Learning, Skill, Industry, and Honor" emblazoned in Btone as tli ideals 

upon whirh lias been built our Alma Mater !ia\' been followed faithfully and 
seientiously by the Senior Class. May the perpetuation Of the spirit of this cri- 
terion of knowledge as exemplified in the activities Of our class, individually and 

collectively, have its ultimate beneficial effect upon the younger members of the 
student body. 

It has been our sincere hope that we have contributed to the lasting welfare 

Of this institution, and in our meager way have, i aptly said, "left foot- 

prints on the sands of time." 



I'ast •••' 



/ R I 9 3 



Niir.ii I'.mi.i v 

Ff nriiirnire, Wis. 

Shi dot th little kimlni sn- 

i .-■ which mo$i i'-"vt a n- 

(htni "i- ilt-Hjiinr. 
Amur; Y. \\ . C. A. 



]',DWiv A. 1 1 1: i k: it 

Rockford, III. 

"Ditxy" 

Hi I Iii >ik* ii f deeper 

I hi ii <i t. 

Y. M. C. A. 



I. nun M. Huivn; 

Si a rliiirk. Minn. 

"Urn' 

I find joy in living ami 

I a u ij it iu <i. 

President, Philomathe- 

ans; Science Club; \V. 

\. A. 



I4i \ik Brokstju 

Menomonle, Wis. 

Hi is not hi the roll of 

common mi a. 



Cw ii i » Cum, in 

Casco, Wis, 

■■<',,.!- 

Shi runt a quiet, modest 

race, 
Marquctte-LaSaJle; Sec- 
retary, Senior Class 




B. V. A hiimv 
Chiaholm, Minn. 
• I'iV 
Brains and ambition are 
the foundation of sweoeee, 
M. A. P.; S. T. S.; V. M 
t'- A.; Kclitor, Stnnt'intJi 



Mir.l>Hl n A Hi i ivi 

Owatonna, Minn. 

"Mil in" 
W$ a well known fact, 
She Htretp run act. 

8. M. A., M. A. P.. Mar- 

quette-LaSalle; Vice- 
President, Home Eco- 
nomics Club 



Ai.nuu M. Bra, 

Greenville, Pn. 

Give H„ world the best 

II ii hurt-. 

'"'' ""• beet wSl aome 

back ti> .nnii. 



LOU I.\\ JklXKEH 

Cagnea, Porto Rico 

"Lois Inu" 

l>i, you not know that I 

am a womant 
What 1 think 1 must 

epeak, 
Marqu«ttc'LaSsllej Fhil- 
•hiiiiIIk .in ; President, 

Inky Fingers 

Sikniv A. Cos von 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

"Buf 

)'iiii tUfffttt tl,< xuti],rt. 

and i'u argue nntU the 

smokestack fails, 

3. T. s.; Men's Glee Club; 

Secretary and Treasurer, 

Y M. C. A. 



Page m 




TOWER 1930 





M viiiiAHiT Casey 

Bloomlngton, Wto. 

•'Cases" 

lh r ambition it to !»• 

efficient. 

Secretary! Marquette-La- 

Salle 



Sidney A. Esq 
Chetek, Wis. 

A \ltyj iA/tyl! with a whole 

V\yy\. Itl A.j Trowel 



Wintered Coom 
Colfax, Wis. 

"Winnie" 

Tho' it'* work, work, 
■work, 'i nil worry, 

Tin >-• is always timt f" 
plOf. 

Glee Club; Y. W. C. A. 

Cabinet; President, W. 

A. A.; Hyperian; Ath- 
letic Council 

Albert W. Ciii i is 

La Crosse, Wis. 

"Al" 

I in to "-*"' to the sun- 

s-hiiH Hint I never mind 

the rain. 

Treasurer, Mari|uctte-La- 

Saltej S. T. S.; M. A. I*,; 

S Club: Stoiitoniu; Alli- 

let if Manager 



.Mi minis Chasstos 
Mi'-noiiionic, Wis. 
"Merc" 
A,i liki nhie a* »ln m inch- 
es I'll!. 
Hyperian; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet; W. A. A. 




P. A. CUSBKAS 
Hew«y. Whh 

Lot me be what I am, 

ami m • k not to alter me. 

Trowel Club 



Janet E. Clahk 

Memimnnir, Wis. 
"Jen ii if" 

Somebodfft tenotome. 

S. M. A.; Student Ad- 
visory Hoard 



R OLA Ml H. Fjiasi h 

Norfolk, Nebr. 

"Red" 

If between Inhnriuij and 

resting 

Life in divided hest, 

Let others do tho labor- 
ing 

A ud I will do- the rest. 

Df Holay i Metallurgy ; 

"S" Club 



KaTIIHVX CoINSkLL 

Oconoiriow oc, Wis. 

hath" 

Then it a-' > nd to toorl . 

but thort it lime to piny. 

Science Club; Hyperian j 
President, V. W. C. A, 



Siiivev Heath 
Wells, Minn. 

"Sid" 
I come in early, I come 
in late, 

H tit I trlwayn lira mi r/r In 
' < > p my date. 



Uton^fbw. 



Page JO 



7 f> n i n i ') 



HlUNUD DlKOKK 

KUbourn, Wi>. 

"ltiiikt >■" 
AVwafB in, hum with lift, 
ill); T.\W. (". 
iilomathkiin 




Lniirnii " 

)i it and fhrm-ni 
f/k tide \fc^ tidt 
\\ P. nU.,.., 
Munagen ^ 

LgLH OiYi.aokt 
Knit, Minn. 

■ '/ life ./«/f mij- 
'/ lOfjjf yul I'll go 

S. ii im« ( ■|ul,.j V. \V. C. 
;| P^ili>piHt(ii a iiri j Vlce- 
«;]■•<■ 




GOBOOH (). Jenixsov 
Kiiii Claire, Wis.. 

2fr b U-it In thr rale of 

common nun. 
Vice-President, V. M. < . 

A.; Sketch Club; l.titlur- 
.in Students 



Kl'TII H. DODGK 

Meoomonie, Wis. 

/Y«r mrrit. in liki n f'nt «-; 

mh dt ' pef ft t*, 
//m Ism hoCm ■"' nu 
President, Science Clnbj 
V. W. C. A. 



Clayton II ai.vihsiiv 
Rfadison, W'i-.. 

-Clauf 

Out rami'ii atmafu he a 

in rii, 
I In I mil' rim filwttjfir he a 
man. 



Mary I.owei.i. Fox 

Elgin, 111. 

What thould a girl do, 

hut In mi rrti ' (Marii). 
S. M. A. 



Ell WIN K we I vi. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

"If ant hi Make" 

I'm after the man mho 

iiuinlii] zcork. 




7 (t n i: r 19 3 o 



M vkv ft. (5m il n 

MeiKiHiDiiitv Wis. 

Derj' wati n nofo y. m 

are. 

Inky Fingers; Hyper- 

ians; W. \. V.; V. W. 

C. A.; Orchestra 



Earl W. LoCKIM 

lli-rt-a, Ky. 

./ »/»;*■/ irifkrr nftrr 

hnowh dot . 
Metallurgy; V. M. ( \. 



( l| R1KI Ui: ft. II ANSI S 

Dulutli. Minn. 
117 Iroi sol '" o«r#i 
Our life in work. 
Scii -nrr Club; 1'liiloma- 
tlican 




Paii. Mabsckxbb 
HenompnJe, Wis. 

"Marsh" 
//« -".f tOO VfUt to >>>■ all 

good, 

And too ffiiwi tii i-i ■ 



Hern I.imiai.i- 
St. Paul, Minn. 
/ witt do what I phatt 
tmd doing what 1 please, 
! wUl ham my wSR. 
Y. W. C. \. ; W. A. A.j 
Stout Lutheran Student 
Association; Vice-Presi- 
dent) H.v pi-rians 




lll'SSKI.I. I, AN lll> 

Madison, \\ i> 
/>-,.' iliiiuj.* art intpot$ibl« 

ti> diligi «ri inut skill. 



Jask Hamhi.ky 
Ramsay, Midi. 

And if flu's hilil in rlu 

ii III in if 
And niruiM In ilo il 

n altp, 

Sht "• <■' r li ts n go I'll 
li'ih-er 
Unl liiim it fully, fin - 

tsf. 
I ilec Club; President, 
Home Economics Club; 

S M, A. 



John F. ft. Mvik/ki: 

Watertown, Wis. 

"Hor" 

//. hat common ■■ u< In 

an uucinuii'iu way. 
Football; Y. M. C. A = 
S C 'lull 4 Square and 
( ompass, Vice President 



Aini.i; LahcKTOS 
M<-iiomoiii<-, Wis. 
Red" 
You can't ttU iiii out- 
ward n jijii irrnnri .i what 

mischief is htddan within, 

M. \. P.; S. M. A.; 
w A. A. 



■OB MiHIlUTT 

Madison, Wis. 

"J,„ii" 
.1 man after hi.' MPS 

hinrt. 



i w i: r j 9 :i o 



Hstiii:h P. McKoWKK 
Lake Crystal, Minn. 

'■/•;/• 
';h'i me fustian, I lav it, 
M. A. i'.: PhiTomatbean 



(inn. ii K. .Mi ihtiM-.ii \ 
HlbbJng, Minn. 

"Mar" 
Sill art lliK.t not iitilfcflti 

ii lack of wisdom. 
Football; President, De 
ftfolay; President, S Club 



Irma Nichols 

Menomonie, Wis, 

riu thoughts of youth 

nn long, htii'l thOUffhtt. 

M. A. P. s S. M A .; is- 

social I* Editor, Stoutonle : 

Vice-President, Senior 

CTaw 



I'h in k Not uoom 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

l.i I mi; he what I am uiul 

seek not to altar ma. 



N'lni.llll I'm: 

Rl*er Fulls, Wis, 

"IV 

4 tight pood tport, we 

'ill "-hint. 
V W. < . A. 




Marshall W. Millar 

Menomonie, Wis. 

"Marsh" 

i.ii vii man d a volunu 

if you know how to road 

hi in. 
M. A. P. 



A \ (Jot Moi: 
Mi-numiniir. Wis. 

Yt'itr fan- ii ham*!. 
frank, and true; 

You carry happint m with 

I/Oll. 

S. M. A. 



I'linMAS W. Nslsdji 
Astoria, Ore. 

-Turn" 

An expert on datos. 
Band. Rifle Club 



t.r.vA M. Page 

Elk River, Minn. 

• /%M?r" 

Sober at a juAgo, l>itt 

/inn ran tuvrr tell. 

Philocaatheanj Science 

Club; Glee Gub 



AX l'ltKJ.II.VGKR 

I. a Crosse, Wis. 

■Ih inii " 
A little nonsense now 

mill thru r.v rilixhril hi) 
I In belt •'{ in in. 

President, M. A. P.; 

President, Senior Class; 
S. T. S.; Stoiltonlai Mar- 

qiirtte-LaSallc 



>,»mUIf| 



1'age S3 




T O W E R 1 9 i 



■ h?„r 



Hfirhkht C Kii/h >\ 

Superior, Wis. 

"RAW 

tin lii.f finiirii in know 

xcliii fhiittf.i an iw. 
Metallurgy ; Tumliliiig 



Plobkkci; M. Km m \rj>son 

Ininlnn. Minn. 
Sin who h(U I'lifirnrr 

shall aeeomplUih much. 
Science Club: Y. W. C. A. 



K.M.I'll H. Sen AUDI! 

L'niun Grove, Wis, 

Burk" 

Kff'uii nrii pi rsonlfk d. 

President, S. S. A.; 

Basket-hall; M. A. P.; 

S Club 



Hi NKii i i \ M. Sn vi ii i 

Murinelle, Wis. 

"Jlrnrl" 

riu n • nothing in h 
pleatant bg half 

As a phunanl girl with 
a intrrii laugh. 

Hyper fan] Glee Club; 
V. W. C. A. 



Arnold Sunn 

Bfenomonte, Wis. 

h' ' •'■•■ '" mi rrn. fur lift 
is short. 





Myhti.i: Kay 
Mllwaukee, Wis. 

Shi luts „,.,„. i ,!••„,, I. y.. 

virtues. 
A re me 



ThBODOU Kiiswki.l 

Menomonie, Wis. 

"Ted" 

.Ihilitii win* llu- enterm 
of Inn men. 



Em in r Mary M. Sichlkb 

AIiii;i Center, Wis. 

"Nig" 

I.- I ftn world glide, let 

tin ii'rirhl go; 

:■ for i' ears, a fig 

fur a wot 
Miirquetle-LaSiille 



BuNIUU i H. Smith 

Mlddlebury, Vt. 

!'• r.-iv ranei reaps its 

own n ward. 
Y. M. (". A. President 



I'u ii. x ii M. Todd 

Houston. Minn. 

Lifr'* nn l-riirr if ice 

worry; 
IAf< '■■ no lunger if ice 
hurry. 

S. M. A. 



7 O W ER / 9 i 



A i.MA Wursn 

Heron Lake, Minn. 

-.11" 

A wtnaUng wiir. tUtras- 

flvt if run . 
A iiil'illiiu fitting hrr fur 
an if [it ace. 

Philomathean ; Science 
( -lub; W. A. A. 

I I A K I 1 1 1 1 I •'. T\IHH\ 

Mcnomonie, Wis. 

"Bozey" 

flfvtic ft tht medicine of 

the tonl. 
S. T. S.5 De Molayj 

Trowel; Director, Stout 
Orchestra; Assistant Di- 
rector. Stout Band 



Kli/,ahi:tii A. Williams 
Mmntiumii , WlB. 
"Lib'' 
Like f/rm'ilation, »hf ha* 
the power nf attraction. 
President, S. M. A.; Vice- 
President, M. A. P.; 
Stoutonia 



Noll E. Wixar 

Whitewater, Wis. 

• //....A-//'* 

There' § no nuch fulhi tu 

i" Ing in love. 

Band 




Chahlks R. Strong 

Chctek, Wis. 

' liurk" 

Hi lur.\- I hi' rirrent of .ill 

common thing* — good 
common- sente. 

Metallurgy; Secretary 
ami Treasurer of Trowel 



I HI [-1 B, WjilTEllI'BST 

Sav.-tliriiili, < ia. 
Snnah" 

Ili/ili fUghtt hod the and 

wit at will, 

And »0 her tiilir/ne hni 
seldom still. 

Philomathean 



VeRXEH Tl'BKWALl 

Kearney, N'ebr. 

Kiio-.ctidije rinii/'.i hut 

window linger*. 



TiiniouBi: \Vi:j.vnokh 

Milwaukee, "Wis, 

"Ted" 

A fellow of mark and 

tiki 1 1 hood. 

Glee < hilv: Tumbling; 
Band 



Haf. Ax>r M. Carter 

Menomonie, Wis. 
The purtnii of edvcaHo* 

U II" foil U. 



Page « 







SENIORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 

Esther C Bock 
Cora B. Burdick 
Helen Costello 
Ruth E. Crego 
Mrs. Grace Dove 
Helen M. Ehrhard 

IVERNIA E. FORSLUND 

Jessie \V. Hansen 
Margaret C. Hartv/ell 
Kathleen H. Shannon- 
James K. Doyle 
Arthur E. Freeberg 
Edmund Vii.lars 






1'0£C 36 



?s 



JUNIORS 



^ 



Juniors 



WE., as ■ class, have attempted t<> enter into the spirit of curricular and 
extra-curricular activities in a way that will show our irood sportsman- 
ship .tnd a willingness and eagerness to do our part in making The Stout 
Institute an interesting school and one which tills the vital needs of its students. 

That we have had our full quota of honor students, athletes, and embryo jour- 
nalists shows that our attempts have not been in vain. 

We, for the first time, have take.) over the full responsibility of the 7 
and cherish the hope that we have not proved unworthy of the honor. 

We have one full year more in which to prepare for the COming of our Com- 
mencement in its true sense; we have, in addition to rounding out our college ca- 

reers. tc^strive for perfection. "Eva onward, ever upward" toward our goal as 
^n^^tc-"^-^ and true representatives of our school: 

frSs $ JLr?-? *+'# ^ ^*^7 " 

^^ f*i4, /*^U ir^i^^^a «^^j^f 




* 



Pag* 3* 



TOWER 1 9 



Gsoaou Hki.kx Abkr 

Racine, Wis. 

.ihfc" 

I prefer tniiiiqutnt )iru- 

tienre to fluent, folly. 

Vice-President, Ararat 
Vice-President, W. A. 
A. i ST. W. C. A.; Sec- 
retary uml I ri-isurer, 

Science Ciuli 



Hav Hi in. i h 

Menomonle, Wis, 

If hi- bt not in lorn . il" n 
in no beliroing in old 

&, \ . S. ; Marquette-La- 
Salle 



Aiiimii.a AirmMOM 

Rice Lake, Wis. 

"Lonfffi illott •" 

tUeagt mi iln <!<i. luii 

iilic-ayx htuac.i zchi n shr 

in ifiihiii. 
I'nsiiU-ni. Mvperians; 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; 
Tower; Secretary Junior 

Class 

Krni:st Cimiisti:nsi;.v 

Ashland, Wis. 

"t 'liri.il it" 
ffoi a ffmu r not a taint, 

/>' rhnps, 
Hut In '$ l In v< r i) bett 

tif rlnip.i. 

Tower Editor; M. A. P.; 
VIce-P resident, Dc 
Molay; Educational For- 
um; Y. M. C A. 



Hitii Bassiinih 

Sbcbo.vpan, Wis. 

"Rudy" 

Wothinff limit n-ii.i i vi r 

nrhiirnl -.cUliiiitt fiifhux' 

I'llil'Unatlli ;ili 




Frodk Axdemox 
Motley, Minn. 

. I ml It" 
.1 BUM who rirtlli/ i* what 
Ii, wppwrt '" bs — a 

l/l lllll llltlll. 

Band, Orchestra, Metal- 

lurjrv; S I. S : Rifle 

CM) 



M.iruarkt M, Allen 

Faribault, Minn. 

"Margt " 

I tBOidd fit In r ttmntte 

Iflilll i-ii.'l'iv inn niiic'. 



Jimis W. Barheh 

Mcnonmnie, Wis. 

When bfftter tartars n», 

John xcill run tin m. 
Glee Club, De Molay, 

S. I'. S. 



Kmm.v Andi:h«'s 

Inui Mountain, Mich. 

A wilt" 

Sin' it flu '■Inn if" uf the 

-■limit uml tin nhnrt 

of ur 
Y. W. (', A.j Science 

I lllli 



OKvii.r.K A. Ci.kmi.si - 

MIS 

An wpright, downright 

hun rut mini. 




7 o n i: n / 9 



jsZ. 



EVELTX HoRC'IIERT 

Menoimmit-, Wis. 
"JBV 

You'll urrtr vi-ijrii if 
nfhr jfou have known 

her. 
Orchestra, Stunt I.uth- 

IT.'III Slllllftlts, 



.1 UUH W. DICKER 

Menomonie, Wis. 
The furrr of hii own 

111 (ill win it hit will. 



IIm.ex D. Boykxb 

Meiiorimnie, Wis. 

On witn tht danct . 

Hyperion, Y. W. ( \. 

Treasurer 



Rex ExOLESBT 
E/lcva, Wisconsin 
b 1 man; ,»/'■' </«»"'<• 




AX-IC'E CoCKERIM. 

San Juan, Texas 

••('•irh.i" 

Ah! The re' k m'mrhief 

hi hi i- • 
M. A. P.; Secretary, 

Phrleiiiiiithran-, 




Abtkct I.. (iH.ntHN 

Dulutli. Minn. 

"Art" 
His fih mi tptakt veil 

(if hi.s iririiiii* mien. 



Caroms-*: Hrick 
Manitowoe, Wis. 

•' uriif" 

lit -.curt' hir nims tire all 

inn t| riiiijlit ' 

Rifle dub, Stout Luth- 
eran Students 



. 1 amis ( . Dodos 

Mi-iiomnnir, Wi-.. 

■ < 'hartit " 
/h'y atwant twn i" 

mahi •' ha : 
//. '.. good with a rifle, 

mutt admit. 
Rifle Club 



I Im.ks c ' 1 1 x unuuis 

Menomonie, Wis. 

A pltatcnt manmtr h a 

tUi a' fi • urn mi ii'i-iliim. 

S. M. \. 



Oi.w Ksi.i 

Menomonie, Wis. 

"Oh " 

Moderation it the tnodttl 

itiff 11 f In nil 11. 

Riflle Club, Y. M. C. A 



Page 4" 



t o w i: i< i <> 3 o 



M kVOUl Cbojtb 

Menomonie, Wis. 

"Mary 

Thought gotu forth* r 

tlmir words. 

Science Clob; Vice- 

President, Inky PingCH 



Dave Fi:ihi:h 

Menninonie, Wis. 

-Dmr 

I huhi it good, good 

lliiniix *h"utd ■pnnn; 
With time I will not 
quarrel. 
S. T. S., Marquette- 

I.aSalle, Itifl. (Till. 



Ni:r.i>A Dam row 
Pond du Lao, Wis. 

I'm littlr. l-iit I'm wUi. 

riyperian, Y. W. ('. A., 
Stout Lutheran StmlenK 



Aim hi (tihh)ki('h 

Ball Claire, Wis. 

W'nrrii itml I hnv never 

ill' I. 



RjEUBEH K. I I ii. i \ 

Waseca, Minn. 

I,i i the world •/" a$ it 

limn : 

I'll i ill, i u an uwo « , 
Rifle chili, stout Luth- 
eran Students 




Rat IV. F.u-iih 
Viroqua, Wis. 

" Firvnr" 

Don't lei pour ttudfoe 
inti v(i r> witt pour 

I ll 111 ill lull. 

Rifle Club, v. M, C. A. 



Marietta DiIhamir 
Oshkosli, Wis. 

"Fritz? 

To her. ttudp U plag. 

Science Club; Treasurer, 

W. A, A, 



Leo A. Gaumm 
Elmwood, Wis. 

•itur 
To do liim juttiee noede 

" book about, 
We'll mini it up: ii good 

i ilil urn lit. 

Rand, S. T. S., Stoutonia, 
Cheer Lender 



Bos V DlXXlES 

Menomonie, Wis. 
"Ed" 

.1 mi riii heart inns all 

dag. 
Stout Lutheran Students 



HttKVIIAHl) C. II \i.i: % 

Decorah, Iowa 
"Barm g" 
If he had boon born 

tminr, 
Ont would have died 
laughing est ih, othti 

StOUtonla, Tower, M, A. 

P., Tumbling:, Stout 

Lulhenin Students 



**_-. 



^mSff.^nM 



£ 






f£~ 


T == ^ = 




, 


Tjjr. 








' '->Pf< 






lllllllr^ 




ZfllJIJI] 


J 




Cs 



T Off E R 19 3 




KVKI.VN M. (lIESK 

Mrnnmonie, Mi-,. 

/.. 

; /,. mtpoki n word 

'•■".'.•• •-■ ii" troubU. 

Science dubs Y. W. C. -V 



Wlll.AKII ('. I1\S--,,n 

N. St Paul, Minn. 

-Lrfl,,- 
And Vi'lit li a JihIii'm in the- 

<■'<>■ . 
You kmnc all other 
things (fin* pJ 
M. A. P.; S Club; 
Basketball; Vice- 
Pri-sidi-nl, S. T. S.; 
Treasurer, S. S. A.; 
S. S. A. AdvKorv 
Board 

Alice H. HasLsaiiD 

Crookston, Minn. 
".II- 
ihirr'.t nothing *o con- 
tagion* "••' enthusiasm. 

M. A, P.; Phlloni.itlir.iii ; 
Treasurer, (ilee Club; 

Vice-President! Stout 
Lutheran Students 



Louis E». Sxswb 

\ -'il.intl. Wi>. 
■•' 'a rlii" 
/*< ii' thinp* art im /•■!.'■ 
ttbU l<> dilifft a'-' "nil 

.skill 

De Molayj Y. M. C A. 



I HAM IS I I III. 

Colfax, Wis. 

"Bptkt " 

Lifr is what ism make it. 

W. A. A.: Y. W (" A : 
Arerne 




Jofl piunk 0. KnisuKR 
Wadena, Minn. 

-.h," 

S/n MSHM iliijuifii •! —but 

waU until fitiu know her. 

Hyperlan; W, A. A.; 

Y. W. C. A.; M.tr- 

quette-LaSalle 

Alf IT A M. (il Mil AC II 

Livingston, Wis. 
•A'i'/v 

fit. nod With a deep 

§i nit "f humor, ran 

i iijuii" life, 

Stoutoniat It ;i n dj 

V. W. C. A.s Hyperlanj 

President, Glee Club 



Wai.tkr H. IIintz 

Menomonie, Wis. 

Silinrf commit* »" man. 

Rifle Club; Metallurgy 



|-'n wris I )sc mi ,1 ri.is 

Lyons, New York 

-Ilirk.ir 

••I'rtj/t" of il" Junk 
S. T. S.; President, 
Junior Class 



Thomas Jcsock 
Menomonie, Wis. 
"Tom" 
"/'• »■/.•- to all butim 

mi uii/ii-i /. nding wttjn 
Industrious mul diligont, 

In mak&t linn rrlllllf 

S. T. S., Secretary und 
Treasurer; lliflc Club. 



t o n er 19 3 o 



Una W. Klhkes 
Hiwiihik, Minn. 

"Knrnrifiini " 

.In mtnre of cheerfulness 

is worth a ton of 

tad u ess. 

Y. II ('. A.; Marquette- 

LaSalle 



Wai.ti:b Krni: 
Arcadia, Wis. 

Hi is a Well Hindi' man 

who hat determination. 



Maby A. Hryz 

Me] rose. Wis. 

'Tit business, 'tit Ijiiu'i- 

ness thai wilt bring 

her fount. 

Science Club 



Mablo W. MoCl i i .i'i i.ii 
Menoiuonie, Wis. 

"Mae" 
I Wet work — it fateinatot 

me. I rem sil and 
watch it for hoars. 

S. T. S.; Stoutonla; 

Tower 



Eloise L. Larsi:n 
Menomonie, Wis. 

"fjiir.~-" 

Lei us bt "}' and doing. 
Y. W. C. A. 




Claire Knctsoa- 
Mcnomonie, Wis. 
Playing a lane on my 
Uttli pi- 

I Ittittih and joki "ml 
plot/ with life. 
Band; Glee Club 



Francks W. Isenfeldt 
Menomonie, Wis. 

'■ I'-i n n i>" 

Qiilr/hl sin mixes her 
work ana spurts and 

kiitrw.i not what it u 
to boast. 

Hyperion ; President, 

Areme; Secretary, 
W. A. A.; Tower 



Gucx Lock wood 

La Crosse, Wis. 

. / ;i <■ n i a I disposition 

brings its owner many 

friends. 

Tumbling 



Viviw I'., IIfwttt 

Ettrlck, Wk. 
"Viv" 

tin linn irf lift is .short; 
I 'i spend that shortness 

hiiKilfi were too long. 

Towerj Pliiloiiuitbean; 

Areme j Inky Fingers 



N i- iioj,.as Marsii.io 

Haxelton, Pennsylvania 
"NieW 
A grin is worth a hun- 
dred groans in Oflf 
market. 
Tumbling; Y. M. C. A.; 
Mar«|iiette-LaSalle 




T n W E \i I 9 



HaHHIKT Kciss 

Algomn, Wli. 

Just being >»«/'/'.« ''* " 

fine thing. 




Finiiv Maxweli 

Arknnsjiw, Wi«. 

jiiinnti. thill rttrr: limn 

and I ekaU never agree. 

Metallurgy 



("a hoi. McCluro 
Meimiminie, Wis. 

• arritg" 
Loved, Uminff) toi 
S. M. A.; M. A. P. 



Ht-ni B, MAr.nn.M 

Chetek, Wis. 
"Settp" 

lf$ ffvid to be w> rni 

inn! wise; 
/r.v f/nitl to be honeet and 

trtu . 
Plillomathean; Y.w.r.A. 



John \V. No-iinnr 

Arkansaw, Wis. 

■■.lack- 
11 . level (til the tiny* of 

tin week — etpeclaUp 
Saturday. 

ISiiml; Metallurgy 




('iii^tih W. Ma r 

Elk Mound, Wis. 

"Chn" 
"/It'll In- Kiimi-th'tHii .•■"in' 

day." 

S. T. S.; Rifle Clul ■-: 

Y, M. (". A., St. m- 

tonia; Trowel 



Ghaci: Lindkhhox 

Clear Lake, Wis. 

••!. 'twill" 

A i/trt then wot uf quiet 

mage. 
Glee (.'luli; Stout Luth- 
eran Students] Secretarj , 
Y. W, ( A 

DoN'AT.II MOLDEXIIATER 

Pall Creek, Wis. 

"Dun" 
I don't run \chiit hri/r- 

psns, jimt .in it won't 

happen to ma. 

Band; Orchestra; Y. M. 

('. A. ; Metallurgy; Stout 

Lutheran Students. 

Khkkst August Mtxleb 
Charleston, S. C. 
■■( 'harlee&on" 
■■< litrrh.it'in" fin' king 
from tin 8outh. 
Towers Football; Treas- 
urer, M. A. P.; Presi- 
dent. Stout Lutheran 
Students; Ini ramnral 
Itanageri Industrial 

I-": i i 1 1 1 ■ ; 1 1 iim.'il l'"i >r n m 



KllN ^ (I aim Maiiikws 

Ashland Wis. 

"Eddie" 

She't thr gM who get* 

thin ii* <ione. 

Ma rqiK't te-LiiSalle ; 

Tower 



^m^A**. 



Page 44 



H I 93 



Maw i Niibh \u.> 
Kenosha, Wis. 

If I/mi don't know Mabel, 

il'.* ritinr 'it.'h nii.ifrirtnnr. 

Science dub; Girls' Glee 
Club; Areme; YW < \ .: 
Stout Lutbenm Students. 



I.i c 1 1: n I' \i i i -. 

Holland, Mich. 

■ i.,r 

j took "ii tlu bright ttdt 

nr polieh thr dark tide, 

S. Club: Marquette- 

LaSalle 



Hbhukttb L. Qtm.1 lira 

Menomonie, Wis. 

"Doth" 

Aek her to tmplain 8hiz- 

umirrhrtnn i/rr Ii ..• rt revix- 

im riuil .ilii'H rin il. 

W. A. A.; I lyprriiiri ; 

Stoutonia; Vicc-Pretf 

dent. Y. W. C. A. 



I", i mi in M. Run 

New Orleans, La. 

"Czar" 

{it'ilil air eattlet mul 

(in it fiut foundations 

under '/" m, 

Rifle Chibi Tower j S. S. 

A Advisory Board 



ClIAltMS Kl'IXIIIII.M 

West \iiis. Wis. 

•'Chuck" 

/.< ' Boeratet torn*, back 

nnd claim hit horn ■' 

in a ii. 

Glee Club; Y. Iff. ( . A. 




1 1 ii. is Novak 
Cobb, Wis. 

•.\>ir itk" 
Real worth r#ewifM mi 

Interpreter. 

Tower; RMIoimitbcan; 

Science Club? Y. W. C. 

A.; Treasurer, Home 

I eonomlcs Club 

I , \hi A. I'i i EBSOM 

Republic, Mich. 

"Pete" 

Ii, pendable he ie, "I- 

wapt cm willing n* 

can , " - 
Y. M. C. A,: President, 

Rifle Club; Secretary, 

Metallurgy 



1 1 lit: v R \i h nisi H 

Racine, Wis. 

"Belffit " 

Writi !•" as om who 

loves >•■ r fellowmt it. 

dice Club; Y. W, C. A.; 

Vice-President, Science 

Club 



M : i ii v Reek 

I l;i/.< Iteill. Pn. 

"Ufl" 

il, hat a logical mind. 

Delffolay 



|'"hv\(i:s A. St iihhi:i>i:r 

Two Rivers. Wis. 

"Schradf" 

Tfaturt madt hi r what 

■A | is 

. I ii<i m tn r modi anothi r. 

Timer; M. A. P.{ Vice- 
I'resident. Junior CUUS. 




7 O W K H I 9 i 



'-£*£. 



ClIAlI.OTTI. B. WaTCIIOHX 

Houghton, Hick. 

With n i«ti« all her own. 

Glee Club; Y. W. C. A.; 

Vice-President, Phihumi- 

thenns 



JIanxo B. Kvsiikho 

Alpha, MliIi. 
Iff put* hi* worrit* in 

th« bottom of hi* h<<n-l 

and tits "« the I'ui and 

smile*. 
Orchestra: Stout Luth- 
eran Students 



LawUHO! Sattkr 
Hopkins. Minn. 

•■ /in itjf" 
Originality Phu. 

Metallurgy: Cheer 

Leader 



Wji.ua u J, Son ii 
Bonner, Mont. 
"MP 
H'tlniirir. t-vmiKi, ■■ 
flu- islf-kslphig num. 
Tower; Sti in i (mi;i : Presi- 
dent, Mari|iiette-l,nS:i]lr: 
Treasurer, Junior Class; 

Industrial Education 
Foruno 



G»:om;i. Smant 

Hen onle, Wis. 

libit , xt'if-ptut*! '•..■.., d 

ji" '•;>'»• '/'< tli in//* •/nil t- 

Ifl n, nth/. 





Ki:nt Marquis Riggs 

Jacksonville, 111. 

"Ki,I- 

To '" Ukod '"/ im nit >* 

iU' hiffki ■■■' tomnUmont 

XCI ''"It I'<l If. 

President, S. T. 8.; 
V. M. C A.j Tower; 

Stniitonia; Industrial 
Education Forum 



II VHC.ARKT SeNTV 

Independence. Wis. 

Shi '.» ft* ijinial <i.i she i* 

livil/i. 

Science Cluh 



Ml IV IK J. So.41MKftVlU.il 

Minoiiiiiriie, Wis. 

■W 

Mot xchat he floes, hut 

tunc he does it. 

Band; Stout Lutheran 

Students 



I C • ill Q It. ScKOXTf 

I.v.mston, 111. 
■II nf it*" 

Sh< '■• not too f'Htii t" in- 

fill U ill II. 



ltissiMi Waixix 

Willmar, Minn. 

'■i: ust if" 

I', ,-.i,it itil ;t thjt name is 

Rusty. 

Football j S Club; Stout 

Athletic Council 



TOWER 19 .i 



DllllMIIIV P. WlU.IAMS 

Menomonle, Wis. 
"Dot" 

Xoni fmt ht-r*rlf run hi- 
ker I'liml. 
S, M. A.j Vice-President, 
S, S. A. j S. S. A. Ad- 
visory Board 



PETKH P. //IMMUHMAN 

Auroro, Minn. 

"Llm" 

Pitch htm in/-, (hi WU$ 

mill hr'll riHHF up K'iill 

n fi*h in his mou Hi. 
S. T. S. 




Fraxcis Whiting 
Antlgo, Wis.. 

A f/O'irl ftnih-nt. n pood 

xcurki-r. mill a good 

frit ml. 



Abtfti"r Pstkmoh 
Eau Claire, Wis. 

"A rt ''•■ ' ' 

I'm In n fur work and 

fin <j< tting It, 



I.ORA L. Wjlde 

Glasgow, Ky. 

■'/v'i nhlrkr/" 

I hurry not; neither do 

I worry, 
Hnnii' Economics Club 



JUNIORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT ilM'KAK 



Clara I.nrisi: Hikri 


1 FTTfl A NIIIRSII \ 


I"i V. Mahskwk" 


l',V\ .llNSI \ 


Arnold J, DlKTHlC'll 


Stasi.i;v Hawiatz 


Mks. M. .Iniixsoy 


B.OBBBT KCW 


Jiiiin linn. 


Kl.l AMIR M. Nkj.sox 


A SKHKU 1. ARSON* 


.Matt Vikii.k ii 


Ihk.ni: Stiii.i/ 


Fl.llYII C I.ARSflV 

I'm H k Ma \ \ 


1 i A BUT Woi.KC.R A M 







TO n ER J <) 3 




Till. Fourth Annual Junior Prom was held on Saturday evening, April twentj 
.sixth, in the Stout gymnasium. The decorative scheme was carried out in 
black ami white with the modernistic diamond effect. Chuck Grarbei and his 

Commodore Club orchestra presented a aelet-trd and varied program for this event 
which is ciin- of the most delightful of the soda! functions held at Stout during tin- 
year. Tins occasion, which represents tile efforts of the Junior class, proved to be 
much appreciated by those who attended. 



COMMITTEE (HAIR MEN 



Ernest Mulleb 

I li i.Mi-Tii Bramstedt 

WlLLIARD Hanson 

William Soucie 



General Chairman 

Entertainment 

Decoration 

Finance 



LrriAN I\\ri.rs - - Program 

Francis Jn.i.v - - - - Reception 

Aroella Anderson - - Refreshment* 

\mt\ (it MK.xrii - - - Publicity 



PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 




President and Mrs. B. I". Kelson 

Mr. and Mrs. ('. A. Bowman 
Miss Michaels 



Mr. It. L. Welch 



MfatauW..- 



Page tS 



Mr. Price 

Miss St raver 

Mr. and Mrs, Thomas .lohnston 



CHAPERONES 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Davison 

Miss Jeter 



Miss Hassk-r 



^^XXAXVXAWU TO 



SOPHOMORES 



<km//////m\\mmmM 



TOWER 7 9 3 



Sophomores 



ENTERING in the fall of 1928, the Sophomore Class has maintained a posi- 
tion of supremacy throughout its now seemingly short, but eventful, career, 
The class immediately organized and under the leadership of efficient officers, 
wisely chosen, the trying days of Froshdom passed smoothly and safely. 

The fall of 1929 found the same group, striplings no longer, ready for the 
added duties and increased responsibilities of full-fledged sophomores. Aware 
of the advantages of early and thorough organization, the class was the first to 
choose its officers and prepare for the year's routine of class activities. Notable 
among these activities was the wary watch maintained by the vigilance committee. 
Many a repentant freshman rued the day he so wantonly ignored the mandatory 
decrees laid down by the Mighty Sophomores. The varied list of clashes between 
the traditional enemies proved disastrous to the underlings in every instance. 

The class of "32" displayed a fine interest in all school activities. Their par- 
ticipation in the work of every school organization proved a credit both to the class 
and to the school. In athletics, the students, who had shown their mettle already 
during their freshman year, readily obtained some of the most coveted positions on 
the school's representative teams. 

It is our desire, in every way, to augment the spirit of Stout, and to make our- 
selves an integral part of the organization which constitutes the Stout Student 
Bodv. 



ifr.,r 




§fcm^«W_ 



Pate so 



TOWER I <> 3 



i 






■ s "-:. i 



[?& V^s 








CBtCNCffT MGicgch H.RtercrK W/iicMtrccs trWezH&frtc* L 




QCa u '"iVjit." A Fof?giMj\^; 




fTWmTtMG LAnqrcaszln j\ Henoch LFXlmer /YS/4GGAf*o i/3u7EW/torr 




VVolp SGcvlsoh CNess Jcuson H 3/?AM3rro EZMut*n/\Y 




TOWER 193 




HHwiom LHob*kt rDoETzc W.Hoacpr D Sf=>£:/f=t3 SKachc-l. 




ElPjCfiSOM G TF*S\Et£TFt ECufi?f?Af* ETWin A L. U/VOCEM 




EoMtTM BBHICKCR C. /V£-JLSOrv F~Knh_/\H3 tLH*\N± \-V^iV=?SO/V 




IGiLACHraoM GLahson Wm« l EK^ishh M3imonson 





MBcrrcffLY AAoca W/^twffAy •JNcude&hch MAnoch^oh /\Xuj*. 



R 1 9 :i 



m h %*i 

HRoae: KUno CIawo/v //Aa/vcas D.Couc U/?/s/*so* 






ffiMrtO/v C CffYOCffMAN FF*tA,-rSGH L.Lamom WAuhc JfvAHS 





TH<JUH£H 



J £>LAu&nrLR 



SOPHOMORES WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 



Gersldine Anderson 

Frode Anderson 
Theodore Bieleeki 
David Bitter 
George Biw< f 

Harold K. Bran.lt 

Charles I'. Childress 
Jefferson It. Cronik 
Steve A. Cvengros 

Marian Cress 

Alvin 0. Erdinaii 
Mrs. Genevieve Dutton 
Daniel \V. Green 
Katherine Graslie 
Philip Haass 
Ervin 0. Hagemess 



Carl H. Horrneinann 

Walter H. Husko 

Fred H. Johnson 

Lawrence Kunz 

I intnn Laiurenderfer 

Donald K. I.ind 

Nnrma Elizabeth Murra\ 

Ronald K. Miller 

Leonard Ney 

Gordon O'Connell 

Keith Penn 

Edward Radke 

Lauretta Sehniidt 

Mrs. Mabel Shearer 

Hazel Weir 

Mrs. Mabel Ziiiiiiiennan 




T O H E H 193 



Fishing Fever 



The season for fishing is almost hen ; 

1 think it is the best part of the year. 
I'd like to forget all about books 
And enjoy myself, baiting a few hooks. 

I'd like to sit in an old rocky boat 
And down the river with the current float. 
And east a pale yellow plug as I pass 
\ Leaning willow and hook a nice bass. 

What better sport coiild any man wish 
ThfliB landing ;i slick, slim, silvery fish, 
And see him flipping in the net, 
Then wonder how many more he can get ? 

I like to feel the jerk of a strike 
And pull in the victim and find it a pike. 
And have a variety in my creel, 
Among them, occasionally, a slippery eel. 

What kind of food makes a better dish 
Than gome nicely browned, fried fish? 
That's enough to make a man sing. 
Whether he be peasant, merchant, or king. 

This day's sport is not nearly done, 

I or I'd have to tell it to everyone. 

And when I'm an old man, I can blow 
How I used to catch them years ayo. 




I prefer a warm day when skies are blue 
And the northwest wind has dried the dew, 

And hear the birds singing from the trees, 
While they swing gently in the breeze. 

Who wouldn't like such a day. tell me, 

Winn 1 a man can forget his misery. 

Trials, temptations, and daily strife. 
And think of the better tilings of life? 



-Harry Fhinoeh '29 



~*~ 



Pat* 54 



|psm\\\\ii \m 



FRESHMEN 



Si 






7 O If E 1< 



The Freshmen 



WE entered Stout in the fall of 1929 and put on our green caps and tarns, 
but only because we bad been told before we donned them that this was 
a good way of recognising one another and of getting acquainted. Some 
of us bee ouainted too quickly and for the fir-»t time in a number 

of y.ars the Prosh showed they weren't bo green or angelic! It happened that 
our vocal chords didn't produce such a bleat as was expected. So, we weren't the 
goat this time. What: You say the Frosh girls look pretty nice to your Yes, 
It's true: you can't deny it. because we noticed that the upperclassmen have been 
admiring the Frosh girls. A- we see it. it"s just another case of "such popularity 

must be deserved." 

We have tried our best to help uphold the honors of our school, ant! we've 

showing a willingness to work and a firm respnt for our instructors; we feel 
that we have made a successful start and that our first year has been a tar better 

one than anyone hut the Frosh themselves can realize. 

.Just a glance at us. the Freshmen, will suffice to show that a mightier rlass than 

[ass of "88" "• rer entered Stout. 

We contributed men to both tin- football and basketball teams. Many of our 
number hold prominent places in the different organisations of the school. 

We. as a class, have been noted for our Pep and hope to show our spirit in 
the classroom and athletic affairs not only at Stout, hut also in our professional 

lives. 

We realise that the fellowship of man with man is of inestimable value ami 

that the acquaintances of our college career will form lasting bonds, treasured 

memories which will be an enduring source of much pleasure. Campus - 

has done much to extend our circle of friends; rOOting at an athletic ion 
test, talking in friendly groups, or having a jolly good time at the week 

dances, each has had its part in making our school life more enjoyable and 
complete. 







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FRESHMEN WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT AN'KAR 



Gene\ ieve Alcott 

Otto Baker 

Virginia Becktol 
Ralph W. Brownsey 
Arthur L. Dehlinger 
Paul Doyle 
Marvin K. Fladoes 
John H. I-'lor 
Stanley Gilbertson 

Holland M. Oral 

Eva K. Hanley 
Herbert W. Haas* 

>, Clifford Hanson 
\ Reuben F. Hanson 
Henry Harrison 
.milt Hehl 

Ruth Hossman 

Roy Howard 

O. rhard R. Johnson 

Louis Larson 

Lorraine Litchfield 
Lawrence Lopp 

ne G. McLeod 
Raymond McM aughton 
[van O. Millenba :h 
Irene Meyer 




Jean Moc 

Alice I.. Nelson 
Norman Norlin 

Ruth Alberta Oleson 

Miles Olson 

Vernon Olson 
Edith Riter 
Darrel Redgren 
Gerhard Roe 
Edward Rosenfeldt 

Allan! Howe 

John W. Howe 
Frank J. Ruppc 
Virginia Schlumpf 

Hoy Salow 

August Schlumpf 
Dietrich Smith 
Edward Schwarta 
Arthur H. Shudlick 
Harold Steen 

David Stori 

William A. Upson 
Leonard Voightschild 
Raymond S. Weidenfelh r 
Ruth Zimmerman 





















Pige 6» 



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mmsmM® 




t Student Association 



Stout ^Miult-nt Association is an organisation to which every Btudent of 
rhe^vttm [nstitute automatically belongs. 

he purposes of the organisation arc fourfold: to brim; ;ihout .1 smootli- 

nessyn discharge <>t' Btudent activities through scheduling all school and social 

|cy\iti<s on both a weekly and yearly calendar, to distribute to the Hand, the 

lien's Glee Club, the (iirls' Glee Club, the Manual Arts Players, the Athletic Coun- 
cil, the Lyceum Committee, the Stoutonia and the Stout Student Association the mon- 
vr received at registration time for activity fees, to issue to all members of the or 
ganisation the master tickets which give admission to entertainments sponsored by 
the above organizations, and to organize plans for Homecoming and Commencement. 

Officers for the succeeding year are elected in May in order that the plans 

for the coming year can be made early in the fall quarter. 









OFFICERS 



Ralph Schaude 
Dorothy Williams 

Claim BSE S R88 
WlLLARD 1I\\m.\ 



I' re. \iil rut 
Vice I' resilient 

Secretary 

Treasurer 






Pcg4 '■■ 



TOWER 19 3 



19 








i, . 



19 



iL. 










Pag* 6s 









-I 






The Stout Student Association Advisory Board 

THE Stout Student Association Ad\ isory Hoard is composed of the following 
members: a man and ••» woman from each of the four classes, and the four 
officers of the Stout Student Association. The Hoard acts on all matters 

pertaining to student affairs and interests, and is a standing committee on 
the rules of the Stout Student Association. 

To carry on this work successfully, the Advisory Board acta in co operation with 
the College Government Committee. A joint meeting is often called to settle 
matters concerning both hoards .>r matters that ••ire to be taken beyond the Student 
\<h isory Board. 

OFFICERS 
Ralph S< hacde - • Pretideni 

Dorothy Williams Vice Pretideni 

( LARY88H NB8S - Secretary 

WlLLARO H INSON Trrasiir.r 



MEMBERS 



Janet ("lark 
Theodore Roswell 

Harriet Koss 

Edwin Reed 

Myrtle Anderson 
Helmuth Bramstedt 

Evelyn Ades 
Ralph Brownsey 



, St niors 



/ Juniors 

- Sophomores 

/Freshmen 



? 



Page 64 







■ 








ADVISORY 
BOARD 





H670>- -te 






n.A^:wcti'-32 



Pate f-S 



The 1930 Tower Staff 



THK staff of the 1980 Tower feels Bomewhat a sense of pride and concern for 
the manner In which the publication lias been accepted by the students and 
administration of the school. The responsibility of publishing this year's 
hook was assumed entirely by the Junior (lass, and the personnel of the 
staff consisted entirely of Juniors. 

In producing this hook, our effort lias been Concentrated upon much the same 

objective as that of each staff which has preceded us. that of compiling for you 
a written record of the interests and events which have dominated your past year at 

Stout. We have appreciated every effort which has h, en put forth to aid us in 

realizing the successful accomplishment of our motive, and it is our hope that we 

have not failed. 



THK 
K k x k st Christens e n 
Ardella Anderson 
Kent Riggs 

M.uu.o \I( ( i LLOI QH 

Bona Mathews 
Vivian B. Hewitt - 
Bernhard II \<i N 
Edwin M. Reed 
Frances Inbnfeldt 
Helen Novak 
Ernest A. Mh.i.kk 
William J. Sow is 
Frances Schroeder 



1980 TOWER STAFF 

II i \ging Editor 

- Associate Editor 

- - - Butinett Manager 

Advertising Manager 
- - - Organisation Editor 

Asst. Organization Editor 

- - - Asst. Organization Editor 

Athletic Editor 

- Asst. Athletic Editor 

Feature Editor 

- Asst. Feature Editor 

- Art Editor 
Asst. Art Editor 






FACULTY ADVISERS 

Mr. C. W. Hague Miss Gertrude I.. Callahan 



Page 66 




Patt 67 






The Stoutonia 



THE Stoutonia is th< weekly news badget of the college; it publishes re- 
port- of its activities, gives details of its social functions, and reports re- 
sults of conventions and research work in the field of Home Economics 

and Industrial Education. 

The Stoutonia was reorganised in 1919, and since then lias taken its place 
among the school organisations each year. 

In the eleven years since its reorganisation, it has developed year bi 

into a real news sheet with an unanimous student and a larjje alumni subscription. 

It has given undergraduate writing experience t.> a large number of students. 

Members <»t* the editorial staff are chosen from the student body at large, and 

serve on the staff throughout their undergraduate period. Promotions .ire made 

within the staff, and new members are chosen from the underclassmen. 



FIRST SEMESTER STAFF 



a 



ER E. HAWKBS 

Iii.M.x L. Nichols 
Elisabeth A. Williams 
Chester Mac 
Belinda I. Hrndrh kson 

Hi RNARD C. II \«.kn 

William J. Micheels 

01 I A l: l R 

Henrietta L. Quilling 
Bernicc ('. Bricker 
William J. Soi i n 
( \i;i. Roll 
a i. .'. poelinoer 
Anita Gundlai h 
Alfred M. Rrinh< 
Kathleen L. Lind 

C. HALVBR80N 

rt G. Reich 
Roll 
Byron Canatsey 
Marlo McCvllough 
I )ii\ \i.i> K. Lind 
Kent Rioos 
Mr. C. W. Hague 
Mr. John Favillb, Jr. 
Miss Helen Sar< het 



Managing Editor 

AtSOCiate Editor 

NeiCS Editor 

• Sties' Editor 

Isst. News Editor 

Asst. News Editor 

• Sports Editor 

Sports Editor 

Feature Editor 

E raturi- Editor 

Exchange Editor 

Humor Editor 
- Asst. Humor Editor 

Women's Organization Editor 
Men's Organization Editor 

- Cartoonist 

Businest Ma> 
Circulation • 

-culation Manager 
Circulation Manager 
Advertising Man 
Advertising Ma 
Foreman Mechanical Staff 
Adviser 
Ail 
Adviser 



' 







^4 : 

. 

•-.■ 

- 






Pate 69 




T () 



The Stout Typographical Society 



u 



PHOLDING the traditions of past years, 1 1 1« - Stout Typographical Society 
^ M '- !in l ""' one of the most prominent and worthwhile organisations 
of the college. 



A summary of the year's activities includes initiations, dances, smokers, and 
speeches by faculty members, tradesmen, printing instructors, and students. M 
ings were held bi monthly on Wednesday evenings. 



First Semester 

Kkxt Rhhm 

W'li.i.AiM) II 1NSON 

Thomas .' i »o< k 



V. MIOM \ 
F ANDERSON 
c. BEINER1 
R. BERGER 
.'. B IRBER 
D. BITTERS 
J. CARN1 S 

B. CAXA1 

C. CRYDERMAN 
C. CHILD P 

IRDINER 

A. GILLES 

B. H VGEN 

K HALVERSON 



OFFICERS 

President 
I'/r. President 
Secretary 

MEMBERS 

W. HANSON 

P. II \ \ss 
I.. II WVKKS 
T. HOOPI !•' 

C. HOERN'EM \N 
T. JCNGCK 

P. .HI. IN 

P. I KRSi IN 
C.I. \|{S<>\ 

D. 1. 1 \i) 

M. MCCULLOt'GH 

< . m \r 

W. MICH EELS 



Second Semesti r 
Kent Rioos 

WlLLARD I i an -on 
l'i i ik ZlMMBRM \n 



w. MURH W 
P. M \\N 

F. NOV \>« l WC] 

G. NELSON 

G. "( ONXELL 
\ POELLINGER 
A. PETERSON 
K. I<!< - 
R. KKIi K 
J. RUDE 
(. KOI. I. 

A. REINHOLD 

ii. r \riM w 
I'. ZIMMERMAN 



Page ,-o 



TO 



i v 



3 
















Pttg* 71 












T 



The Girls' Glee Club 



HE twenty two members of the Girls' Glee Club form a group that is really 
interested in tin- study of the best in classical and modern music. 



Chosen from the student body after a voice test, they are given the oppor- 
tunity of learning and improving their sight reading, and of improving and 
developing their voir. s. 

In addition to giving an annual spring concert, the club entertains the as- 
sembly several times during the year and takes part in the Christmas program. 

OFFICERS 



Ami \ GUKDLACII 

Ha/ki.i.k I'i.v.i I 
Marie Simonson 

Ai i.i II kSLBRUD 
MvitTI.K AXDBRSON 

Emma Nrwbi 

Miss M m.iim ii 



President 
President 

Secretary 
- Treasurer 

Librarian 

Pianist 
Director 



MEMBERS 



ALICE II tSLERUD 
HAZELLE PLAGE'] 
MARIE SIMONSON 



First Soprano 

MARJORIE PUNK 
MYRTLE ANDERSON 
HENRIETTA SIEVERT 



Srt-ond Soprano 

WINIFRED COOPER IRMA GILBERTSON 

CHARLOTTE WATCHORN ELVA PAGE 
BERNIECE BRICKER KIIODA ROSSLER 



MABEL NEERG \ltl> 
JANE HAMBLEY 



Altos 

ANITA GUNDLACH 
I IK I. (I \ RASMUSSEN 



LUCILLE SCHULTZ 
GRACE LINDERSON 
M \U I H A KETURAKET 



ELEANOR VERGIN 

ANNA W IS I MAN 



MINNIE CHRONQUIST 



? 






Page 7* 



T O II / / 9 




mam m*hon».v. a&ct-wwj. 


















Y. W. C. A. 



T 



HE Young Women's Christian Association is one of the oldest organisa- 
tions on tlu- campus and one of the most active. It holds up to its mem- 
bers the ideal of service t<> humanity and the living of a true christian life. 

Through the inspiration ami encouragement given by the advisers and Cabinet 
members the n«-w members are encouraged to develop and to broaden their sphere 

of Christian activities. 






V. W. C. A. OFFICERS 



KaTHRTN COUNSEL!, 

1 1 E X R 1 ETTA QciLLI X Q 

Grace Linderson 
Helen Bunker 
Winipri i) Cooper 
Ardella Anderson 
Emma Hansen 
Mercedes Crj 
Henrietta Sievert - 
Georgia Aber 
Mildred Dinoee 



President 
Vice-President 

Set retary 

- Treasurer 
World Fellowship Chairman 

- 

Social Service 

Religious Meetings 

- Bible Study 

Finance 

- Publicity 



ADVISERS 



MISS MICHAELS 
MISS M< ( ILMON I 
MISS PROGGATT 
J)|{. BACHMAN 



SS Mil. I. Kit 
MISS BL'CHAN IN 
Miss LEEDOM 
MISS CARSON 









• 



TO 



r~ ft 













The Manual Arts Players 

STARTING as a little theater movement in 1921, with the production of one 
act plays, with partial amateur direction, iiui scenery made in the Manual 
Arts department, Tin- Manual Arts Players lias developed into a dramatic 

organization which takes a major part in school aethities and -rives to the 
students interested in dramatic art an opportunity of study and interpretation. 

The Manual Arts Players produce several successful 'plays of current interest 

each year and take part in the Triangular Contest, in which River Falls Teachers 
Col legi . l-.au Claire Teachers College and The Stout Institute participate. 

Stout placed second in the spring of 1930 with the play. •"The Old Grouch", by 
Richard Willes. 

The organisation also sponsors the Costume Ball which is our of tin out- 
standing -events of the SOCial year. 

OFFICERS 



Miss Violet M. II isslrr 

A:. Poi [.LINGER 

Elizabeth William* 

.' wkt Kyi. i 

-T Ml I.MK 

Lam rexck Johnson 
Marian Cress 

Mi-" \I win: Mi tz 



Director 
• President 

In,- /'/•■ 

- Secretary 
Tree 
Bu tinea Manager 

Costume Mistress 

II tin a ran/ Member 



MKMBKRS 



MYRTLE ANDERSON 
MILDRED BELIN \ 
GEORGE BRYANT 
ERNEST CHRISTENSEN 
ALICE COCKERILL 
MARIAN CRESS 
JANE FOELLER 
LEO GARDINER 
ALBERT GILLES 
BERN \RI> IlACKN 
MILDRED HAGGARD 
u.r.i RT HANSON 
EMMA HANSON 



WILLARD HANSON 
ALICE ii tSLERUD 
DORIS HENRY 
LAWRENCE JOHNSON 
PATSY RUTH KELLY 
J WIT KYLE 
ADELE LANCKTON 
JUNE LOCKHART 
CAROL MC CLURG 
ESTHER MC KOWEN 
MARSHALL MILLAR 
ERNEST MULLER 
BETH MURRAY 



EMMA NEWBY 
IRMA NICHOl 9 
THEODORE PIERS >N 
AL POELLINGER 
GEORGE I'liH i 
RALPH SCIIAi Di 
PRANCES SCHROEDER 
M \KIK SIMONSON 

ARNOLD STOR1 
JOHN wank; \ 

NAIHAM! I W \RD 
ELIZ VBETH WILLIAMS 



Page 76 













/'"*<• 77 



/ 9 




"The Family Upstairs" 



Presented by the Manual Arts Players on 
November I. 1929. 

IN" "The Family Upstairs", a character comedy by Harry Delf, the audience 
lock- into a certain type of American home. Joe Heller, the head of the family, 
is a street-car inspector whose salary is $42.50 a week. I. (misc. his elder daugh- 
ter, is an office-worker, no\> aged twenty one and as yet without a husband. Mrs. 
Heller's one ambition is t<> have Louise married. Joe Heller Bpends his moments at 
home En an endeavor to get his son. Willie, to work. Annabelle, the '"kid sister" of 
the family, has one passion, to get out of practicing her piano lessons. Louise ti 
Dally becomes engaged to Charles Grant, who is a young banker. The two are very 
happy until Mrs. Heller interferes and marly causes tin- breaking of the engage- 
ment. In spite of difficulties, the ending is .» happy one. 

(AST OF CHARACTERS 

Joe Heller, the father Al Poellinger 

Emma Heller, the mother Mildred Belina 

I.oi:is, Heller, the elder sister Janet Kyle 

Willie Heller, the brother John Waniga 

Annabelle, the baby sister Emma Newby 

Charles Grant Theodore Pierson 

Mrs. Grant, his mother Marie Simonson 

Miss Calahan [rma Nichols 

"Quit picking on me.'* 



Page Ti 



7 O W E R 




"Kempy" 

Presented by the Manna] Arts Players 6n 

March i">. 1 929. 

**T / 7" K.MI'V . .1 character corned) in three acts by J. C. and Elliot Sugent, fea 
JV^ tures small town life in a humorous and delightful manner. In the course 
of the play the audience is introduced to a "highfalutin" irirl who marries 
a young plumber-architect who conns to repair the water pipes; the girl 
feels that the plumber understands her because he has read her hook and lias sworn 
to marry the author. As a result of the girl's marriage, there are family diffi- 
culties which develop into many humorous complications. As a whole, the play 
portrays rather realistically various types of characters. 



(AST OF CHARACTERS 

Ruth Hence Frances Verkerke 

"Dad Bence" Ward Smith 

"Ma Bence" Mildred Hclina 

.lane Wade Adele I.anckton 

Catherine Bence Beurnadeen Cushman 

Hen Wade Arnold Stori 

""Kempy" James Al Poellinger 

"Duke** Merrill Norman Olson 



- - 

Pote 79 






/ 9 








Industrial Education Forum 

EACH year the Forum sets for itself the identification of the significant trends 
in Industrial Education, such identification to include the formulation of 
operating plan- to meet these trends. Studies are mad. ..: research results, 
leads coming from statistical studies, and interpretations of occupational 
changes. Applications in professional method and emphasis are scrutinised. Stu- 
dies art- made of changing factors in the teaching profession. Teacher market 
trend-, n u developments in supply and equipment provision, and solutions of the 
requirements in modern industrial teaching situations are analysed. Field trip 
planning, with consideration given to the method of identifying significant new 
factors in industrv, is made a basis tor study. 



OITK -KU.S 



Kin \ktii ShEPARDSOX 

Kent Rioos 
Theodore Ros* bll i 
I.w\ i;i \< i Johnson 
Bernard Hagen 



Chairman 
S retarji 



ERNEST CHRISTENSEN 
ALBERT GOODRICH 
BERNARD HAGI S 
LAWRENCE JOHNSON 
.!. LOCKIN 



MR. BROWN 
MR. BOWMAN 



MEMBERS 

CHESTER MAI' 
ERNEST MULLER 
( !i WU.I.S REINHOl I) 
KENT HIC.CS 
HANNO RYSBERG 

l \< ULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

MR. CURRAN MR. PRICE 

MR. WELCH 



KENNETH SHEPARDSON 

Willi \M >(•!( II. 

GEORGE su ant 
THEODORE ROSWELI. 
(II VRLES STRONG 









H 




The Science Club 



THI'. Science Club is open t<> all members of the Home Economics Depart- 
ment who are interested in the study of current scientific topics, and who 

arc Students in any of the science courses. Tin- club lias tor its purpose the 

crcatinu of an interest in the promotion of science and the development of an 

appreciation of the broadening influence science plays in a liberal education. 



OFl'HKHS 



Ruth Doi 

Hilo \ R ISM 

Gkoroi \ Aber - 
Marietta DbCrambr 

( I. \u\ --. \ -- 

I)k. Bachman 



DR. BACHM w 
Miss CRUISE 

MISS MII.I.F.R 
MISS MC CA1 MOM 
Miss MC FADDEN 
MISS WALSH 
MISS LEEDOM 
GEORGIA \i;i:i; 
ETHEL ANDERSON 
EDITH BREVIG 
MARJORIB CRONK 
MII.DKKI) DINGEE 



- - - President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Pror/ ram Chairman 

Membership Chairman 

Publicity Chairman 



MEMBERS 



GEN'EVIEVE DUTTON 
EVELYN GIESB 
GERTRUDE HANSEN 
MARY HRYZ 
MABEL S'EERGARD 
HELEN NOVAK 
IIKI.i. \ I; VSMUSSEN 



JANET ROBERTSON 
SYLVIA ALCOTT 
EMMA ANDERSON 
K \ I HYRN COUNSELL 
MARIETTA DE CRAMER 
HIT! I DODGE 
HAZELLE FLAGET 









FLOREN< I. RICHARDSON* MILDR ED HAGGARD 
MARGARET SI.NTY ESTHER HENDRICKSON 

DORIS SPEIRS ELLEN NELSON 

M \/l I. WEIR ( I VRYSSE Nl-.ss 

ALMA WINZER ELV \ PAGE 



I 



P«f« St 



*f£ r 







The Men's Glee Club 

THE Men's Glee Club devotes its time to an intensive study of both d&Sfl 
ical and modem music. Membership offers the men the opportunity for 
developing their voices and acquiring increased ability to read music. 

The chorus consists of a group of sixteen voices; the selection of members 

is made- on a strictly competitive basis by the director, at the beginning of each 
school year. 

In addition to its local appearance in the various school programs and in 

concerts, the club gives several concerts in neighboring towns. 

OFFICERS 

Albert Hansom - - President 

Hblmuth Bramsteot - Vice President 

I.kox 1 1. \ ask Secretary and Treasurer 

Sidney Cotton - - Librarian 

Mr. Good - Director 

Mrs. Mitchell - - Accompanist 

MEMBERS 

First Tenor 
SIDNEY COTTON LEON HAASE GERHARD ROK 

CHARLES II VNSON 
First Bass 
JOHN BARBER GEORGE BIWER VBRNER TURNWELL 

OREN STAMSTAD 

Second Tenor 
HELMUTH BRAMSTEDT THEODORE WELANDER THEODORE PIERSON 

CHARLES it KIN HOLD 
Second Bass 
CLAIRE KNUTSON HECTOR HENDERSON ARTHUR COLBURN 

ALBERT HANSON 



7 a 



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The Enharmonic Orchestra 

THE Enharmonic Orchestra, organised this fall, fills a place in the group of 
musical activities lift vacant since the spring of 1927. 

The orchestra, which is Composed of men and women, made its initial boM 

when it furnished the music tor tin- Home milling phiy. Its members are thor- 
oughly interested in music, and hope that with the aid of tin student hody they 
Can make the orchestra an important student activity. 

Donald Moldcnhaiier Student Director 



MEMBERS 



CLAIRE KNUTSON 
LORRAINE STEINBRING 
CLIFFORD HANSON 
PRODE V.NDERSON 
MAHV GREEN 
IRMA GILBERTSON 
ULLMl'TH HHAMSTEDT 



FRANCIS GRIFFETH 
M. \i. GOODRICH 
EARL HALVERSON 
KARL MILLER 
DWIGHT NICHOLS 
WILLIAMS MICH EELS 






/'.»*<• «j 







A 



The Stout Band 



T the beginning of the school year, about thirty student* joined this or 
ganisation. \<> restrictions were made as to ability or experience. It was 
the purpose of the director t.» develop a band from the mat. rial available. 

The members have proved themselves loyal by putting other interfering 

engagements aside and attending rehearsals. The football and basketball seasons 

were made more peppy and more enjoyable, we hope, because tl»- band was 'on 
deck' and played at the games. 

\ number «>i concerts have been given in the assembly throughout the year. 
In this way the Land gave the Btudenl body an idea of what it could do in a 
truly musical way. 

Practice in directing is a popular phase ->t the band's purpose, of which many 
oi the seniors take advantage because of its practical value 



OFFICERS 







Claire K m rsos 

Mki.vin BeTTERLY 

II. I). Pkkbli 
Harold Taufm w 
Charles Ingkaham 



J'r, 

/'• | tidetli 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Librarian 

- Director 



/ 










The Stout Rifle Club 

THE Stout Rifle Club was organised En May, 1927. It la affiliated with the 
National Rifle Association, from which it receives, in addition to an initial 
Issue of anna and equipment, a free yearly issue of target practice supplies 
and ammunition. Small bore target practice and matches are fired on a splen- 
did range built by the members on tli<- floor of the Stout Armory. High power rifle 
firing is practiced during the summer months on Company A's range. 

Several sets of prises, given to the highest shooters in each of the three das* s, 
add considerable Interest to the rifle practice. One National Rifle Association M 
.- awarded yearly. For 1928 1929, this medal, presented on a basis of marksman- 
ship, progress, ami attendance, was won by Maurice P. Blomily. The only i 
fired with an outside club was won by the Stout Club, ami some of the mei 
won medals ami recognition in national postal matches during the year. 



OFFK I ■.!:> 



Earl Petekson 
Paul C. Nelso!s 
Orvillr ( : mention 
Homes ( . R • 

\ on MAX I'm 



President 
Vice President 

Seen tar ii 

Treasurer 
Executive 









/ 9 




The "S" Club 

OS I. of tin- most recent organizations to make its appearance <>n tin- campus 
is tli<- "S" Club, which took definite form at this year's Home coming. All 
lettermen may become members. The object of the <-lnl> is to insure some 
tangible means of retaining the athletic contacts which t li<- men mad.- while at 
Stout, and of giving recognition to all lettermen. 

This year tli<- dub provided sw< .:t. rs for each man who had won his letter 
in athletic participation. A number of benefit attractions have been sponsored, 
among which were a dance, a movie, anil a minstrel show. 



OFFICERS 



( 101 in Morrison 
Keith Pbnn 
Lccian I'.vn.i * 

S. E. I'MI.I s 

Earl Burbidgi 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary Treasurer 

Faculty Adviter First Semester) 

Faculty Adviser {Second Semester 






« 






Pate if. 







T 



The Women's Athletic Association 

HE Women's Athletic Association is an organization to which all Home 
Economics students are eligible. Its purpose is to stimulate interest in ath- 

letics <>f all kinds. 



Points leading to the coveted insignia, W. A. A. emblem and "S," can 1><- won 
by consistent participation in inter class tournaments in flash-ball, basketball, vol- 
ley-ball, baseball, and swimming. 



OFFICERS 



WlXIKHKO C'oOI'KK 

Georgia Aber 

v k a x chs i x k x k k lot 

Marietta DeCrambh 

Josephine Bdikger 

\Ii>> Hilda Ralerid 



ETHEL ANDERSON 
EDITH BREVIG 
M \ry GREEN 
MERCEDES CRANSTON 
v F.I. MA GUTWASSER 
MILDRED HAGGARD 
PRANCES HILL 
EMMA HANSON 



President 

Vice-President 

St eretarv 

Treasurer 

Paint Secretary 

Faculty Adviser 



M KM B KKS 



LOUISE HOBART 
ADELE LANCKTON 
LOIS I.AMON 
RUTH LINDALL 
CLARTSSE NESS 
ALICE OSTRUM 
HENRIETTA QUILLING 
ALMA WINZER 









ras< «7 










Stout Y. M. C. A 

THERE are few students who com.- to Stout who have not in some way be- 
come acquainted with the Y. M. C. A. and its activities. The V. M. C. A., 
as an organization at Stout, has undertaken a program of activity which in- 
volves true endeavor. To foster tin- spirit of fellowship, to inculcate the 
ideals of student citizenship, and to instill tin- pride of worthy achievement in 
>< ihool life is an undertaking not to !><• lightly considered. 

By a combination of social and business sessions tin- members an gradually 

mounting tin- stepN toward tin- desired goal. The annual intcr-colle^e retreats at 

Saint Croix and the conference at Lake Geneva are topics and events always to be 
revived for discussion by the members who attend. 

Several newly inaugurated events of the past year promise to become annual 

occurrences. The all school picnic, sponsored jointly by the V. W. ('. A. and the 
Y. M. C. A., and the all-school Christinas stag party accomplished much toward 
realization of the Y. M. ( . A.'s purpos. ■. 



OFFICERS 




BONSAL Smith 

Earl C. Halverson - 

Sidney A. Cotton 



CABINET 



EDWIN A. BEIER 
EARL W. LOCKIN 



E H N EST ( " 1 1 K I ST E S S E S 
( HESTER \. LARSON 



ADVISORY HOARD 



II. C. Mil. NFS 



President 

- l'icr-1'r,- sitl c nt 

lory-Treasurer 



NATHANIEL P. WARD 
\LFRED M. REINHOLD 



M. M. I'HH'i: 



Ptff# U 




T 



The Stout Lutheran Student Association 
HIS association, with -i membership including all Lutherans who are enrolled 

in school, is .1 vrrv active organization. Its purpose is to hrinj; about a close 

relationship among the members of the Lutheran faith, and to assist in fur- 
thering the affairs henchYial to tin- Lutheran Church at large. 

A joint business and social meeting is held once a month; in addition to this. 
the students take an active part in the church functions in Menomonie. The asso 
nation's main activity for the vear was the sponsoring of a concert by the Nordix 
Male Quartet of St. Paul, Minnesota. 



OFFICERS 



Hunks t Mi i.i.ku 
Ai.ic-k Ham. KIM i> 

[rma Gilbbrtson 

Helm i tii Bhammadt 
Miss Hilda Balbruo 
Miss Lillian Froooa n 



President 
President 
S cretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Adviser 
Faculty Adviser 









X 




Inky Fingers 



INK! FINGERS offers its members an opportunity to develop latent writing 
ability; it also gives them an acquaintanceship with various great works of 
literature. During the past year, the club lias been interested in contempo- 
rary American authors. 



OFFICERS 



Lois Ixa Bunkbb 
Mabjorie Cronk 

Kith LeavITT - 
Ellen Nelson- 
Miss Callahan j 

Miss Sum in t ' 



Ruling Pen 
- Viet Ruling I'm 

- Fountain I'm 
Manuscript Clerk 



Blotter* 






VIVIAN HEWITT 
KI.I.KN NELSON 
BERNEICE BRICKER 



MEMBERS 

MARY GREEN 
LOIS INA BUNKER 
K \ rHLEEN I. INI) 



MARJORIE (Honk 
HAZEL WEIR 
LAURETTA SCHMIDT 



Edna Lanc»i i II 



PROBATIONARY MEMBERS 



Sylvia Ai.con 



Vim.ivi v Bu in.. i 



Kn.i:» .x ROSS 






Pege y» 




The Marquctte-La Salle Club 

THE M.-.r.jurtt. I..-, Salle Club is the organisation through which the Catholic 
young men and women of The Stout Institute are brought together for the 
following purposes: to promote the common interests of the Catholic stu- 
dents of the school; to create ■ feeling of fellowship and coop, ration among 
these students by furnishing them a means of becoming acquainted with one an- 
other; to inspire confidence and self-reliance when in the presence of others by 
means of parliamentary practice and other activities; to co-operate with other or- 
ganisations of the scl 1 in social and other affairs; and to serve as an agent in 

the development and perpetuation of high moral character. 



OFFICERS 



William Soccie 

1 i .01:1 sfci Verbbick 

MaBGAREI ( ISKY - 

Albert Gillbs - 
Mr. H. M. Ha.vsi • 



President 

Vice-President 

s cretarg 

Treasurer 

.hi 






PO£t 91 






T i 




Hyperian Society 



TIIK Hyperian Society i-» a social organisation which was started in March, 
1928. The society i^ composed of a group of women students, who each 
year do active Bocial service work in the school and the community. Plac- 
ing school interests above all else, the Hyperian Society has been participating in 
all school activities during the past year. 



PLEDGES 



BELINDA HENDRICKSON 
ESTHER HENDRK KSON 
LORRAINE LITCHFIELD 



MARY JANE DODS4 >N 
FLORENCE VER BRICK 
EMMA N'EWBY 



CHARLOTTE MC N \B 

M.K l. LYNUM 
M \KI \N CRESS 







Pag* pi 







The Hyperian Society 



OFFICERS 



Akdki.i.a Ami 

Ruth Linoall - 
Kmma Hanson 
Eldrid Wike 

Mi«> Rt ROOIN 

MlJS. W. H. I)\\ IgON 



Pr< 
Vice-President 
retary 
Treasurer 
-At 
Aetociate Ad\ 



MEMBERS 



HENRIETTA SIEVERT 
ELDRID WIKE 
MARIE SIMONSON 
HENRIETTA QUILLING 
RUTH LINDALL 
ARDELLA ANDERSON 



MERCEDES CRANSTON 
HELEN BUNKER 
WINIFRED COOPED 
NELDA DAMROW 
MARY GREEN 



JOSEPHINE BDINGER 
VNITA GUNDLACH 
IRMA GILBERTSON 
KMMA HANSON 
KATHRYN COl S'SELL 
PRANCES INENFI LDT 















/ 9 




Bertha Tainter Hall 



BERTHA TAINTEB HALL was bought by the school in 1906 from the James 
Tainter estate and named tor Mrs. Tainter. With its homelike atmosphere 

and lovely Betting on tin- lakesliore. it makes a delightful dormitory for about 
twenty junior and senior ujirls. 



Mils. Grace M. Dow 
Edna C. Mathews 



Preceptress 
House President 



LOUISE WHITEHURST 
ESTHER SICHLEB 
\\n \ GUNDLACH 
[VERNIA PORSL1 m> 
MARY HRYZ 



MEMBERS 

ALICE HASLERUD 
EDNA MATHEWS 
HAZELLE PLAGET 
ALICE COCKERILL 
1,1 RTRUDE H tNSEN 
MARGARET ALLEN 



MARGARET CASEY 
MILDRED DINGEE 
KATHLEEN SHANNON 
CAROLYN BRICK 
ESTHER HOCK 






"J 1 



/'.'«■ 04 







Lynwood Hall 



L 



YNWOOI) HALL is the newest of the dormitories. It offers excellent ac- 
commodations tor sixty girls, and is conveniently located near the Home 

Economics Building. 



The dormitory was built En I ; * i « > by Mr. Walter ('. (lark of tliis city, bought 
by President Nelson personally in 1928, and taken over by the state in 1927. Its 

name identifies it with tin' forbears of the (lark family. 



Preceptress: Dr. Freda M. Bachman 



KM MA ANDERSON 
ETHEL ANDERSON 
MYRTLE ANDERSON 
MI. I. IK BAILEY 
CECILIA (ADRIAN 
MINNIE CHRONQUIST 
EDNA BICHORST 
NELLIE FOLEY 

MARY POX 

vivian FLORIN 
NELLIE GEIGER 
IRMA GILHERTSON 
JANE HAMBLEY 
JESSIE HANSEN 



MEMBERS 

LUCILE HEBL 
DORIS HENRY 
LISLE HUSON 
RUTH LEAVITT 
GB UK LINDERSON 
RUTH MALCOLM 
IRENE MEYER 
ESTHER MC KOWEN 
(II IRLOTTE MC NAB 
JEAN MOE 
ELLEN NELSON 
HELEN NOVAK 
VIOLETTE PARSONS 
I \s\II. PR VTSCH 



MYRTLE RAY 
JANET ROBERTSON 
MARGARET SENTY 
VIRGINIA SCHLUMPF 
LUCILLE SCHULTZ 
ELEANOR SCHROEDER 
MARIE SIMON son 
DDK IS SPEIRS 
BEULAH TODD 
ill. VNOR VERGIN 
VIOLET W tLSTROM 
ii wi I. WEIR 
ELDRID WIKK 
RUTH ZIMMERMAN 












1 9 



miffWffl WTT mfwnHr nH 




Bertha Tainter Annex 

ADJOINING Tainter Hall, as part of the original Tainter estate, Btands 
Tainter Annex, built in 1908 by t!i<- school as a residence tor sixty-five girls, 
mainly members of the freshman and sophomore class* s. 
With its ideal location on the shores <>i' Lake Menomin, just a short walk from 
the main buildings <>t the college, it represents the best type of women's dormitory. 

OFFICERS 



Mildred Belixa 
Josephine Edixgep. 
Patsy Ruth Kelly 
Nki.da Dam row 
Miss Balerud 




GEORGIA ABER 
ARDELLA ANDERSON 
EDITH BREVIG 
MILDRED BELIN \ 
PAULINE BONESHO 
RUTH BASSEUNER 
VIRGINIA BECHTOL 
BERN'ICE BRICKER 
EL VINE C INTELON 
DOROTHY COLE 
M IRIAN CRESS 
MARY CARMODY 
K \ 1 HRYN COUNSELL 
RUTH CLEMENS 
ELIZ Mil/Ill CAR! I R 
WINIFRED COOPER 
RUTH LINDALL 
EDNA LANGSETH 



MKMKKKS 



DOROTHY MADDEN 
BETH MURR \Y 
EMM \ NEWBY 
(I. MO SSE SESS 
LORRAINE S'ORDLIE 
MABEL M i RG \RI) 
ALICE S'ELSON 
KITH OLESON 
M VRIETTA DE CRAMER 
MARY JANE DODSON 
NKI.DA DAM ROW 
.1 \NI T IV \NS 
JOSEPHINE EDINGER 
1 \M FOELLER 
GAIL G M.l.ow \y 
K VTHERINE GRASLIE 
VELMA GUTTWASSER 
MILDRED HAGGARD 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

House Inspector 

Preceptress 



LOUISE HOBART 
VIVIAN HEWITT 
PATSY K Mil KELLEY 
JUNE LOCKHART 
\I.It F. I.VNTM 
LORR VINE LITCHFIELD 
V.LICE OSTROM 
EVELYN PE 1 I 
GR \< E QUARTERS 
EDITH RITER 
HELGA It tSSMUSSEN 
MARIE SCHROEDER 
HENRIETT \ SIEVERT 
MABEL LOZIER 
FI.OKl.Nc 1 VERBRICK 
I !! IRLOTTE WATCHORN 

ALMA WIN/I I: 



7 






Pant $6 










HOME 

ECONOMICS 

CLUB 







Jl.flAUAftD- COUNCIL 






t'ase W 



; 









-4 





3 ■** • 

■ ""J 


^■^j 



7 






Page 98 
















I'OKt V) 










T«IAJ 



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t.y/'JKt 
JtCTV 



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Page 100 









' - : 







pAUAHit* 




- *(V 





•^j:"f...;n 



PHILOMATHEON 





Page ioj 






X 



; v 


















ID C7 

















Page 105 












ALPOCLUnCCR 

Al Cillu 





Lddic Camatjey 

dlLL JOUCi£ 

Rusty Wall in 






. 






sNNHiBNiiM \\\w//mm 




mm///////ii\\\\\\wmmm 







Mil Floyd Keith 



The Stout Athletic Council 



Floyd Keith (hair man 



FACULTY R E PR ESE N TATIVES 
( . A. Bowman 

Kith Mi. 

S. E. P \i Lira 
Earl Hi rbidoe 
Hilda Balerude 



STUDENT MEMBERS 

S rt\ JOHN MbRTZKE Juniors: 

Winifred c 
Sophomore*: Louis Palmer Freihmen: 

Ai.k i ( Ki i 



Ki S8ELL WaLLIN 
I'll an. E8 I> 

John Harmon 

I.i < ILLE SCHULTE 






THE Stout Athletic Council is an organization whose chief purpose is to 
determine the athletic policies <>i the school. It aims to encourage all 
of athletics, both intercollegiate and intramural. 

The awards of letters and numerals are specified and controlled by tliis 
committee. The faculty representatives are appointed by the i president; 

tin- students are elected from their various class, j. 



Page 10S 







Micheels 
Hoerneman 
Schmidt 
Brownsey 


Captain Morrison 

Harmon Ktihr 

Wolf gram O'Connell 
Cronk Penn 

Slaughter, Mam. gt r 
Peterson Buros 
Cvengroa Johnson 

Gilles, Manager 
Numerals 


Bielecki 
Pordham 

Wallin 

Schaude 
Paulus 


scone 
Rude 
Paulus 

Hoememan 

I Ianson 












Ford ham 










Graff 

Aunc 


Pierson 
J. Harmon McXaughton 
Southern Rowe 


I [oeser 
Schlumpf 














-«rfrf' 







Page i-j9 






TOWER I 9 I 





S. K. PAULUS 



KAMI. Bl'liRIDCrK 



The Trainers 



&* 




NEXT y.ar, the teams will he composed of experienced men with plenty of 
weight and speed. Last season, reserve strength was larking and. due to 
an inexperienced team, the season was only fair. The greater majority of 
the players were seeond year men. There were no easy games: Stout met 
some of the strongest teams in the Conference and showed up fairly well against 
them. 

Syl Paulus. our last year's coaeh. will not be back with us next season. He 
has left the coaching game and is now with a Chicago business concern. Mr. 
Paulus put in three hard seasons with the Trainers, touching both football and 
basketball, besides handling the gym classes. Much credit is due him. for he put 

his ||,art ami soul into liis work and did bifi beat with ulint In- lutd to work with. 
To Mr. Paulus we wish the best of luck and success in his new work. 

F.arl Burbidge. our new athletic director and coaeh. took over tin reins in 
mid-year, He is a Wisconsin man who won letters in football and captained the 
baseball team, Mr. Burbidge comes to Stout from Antigo High School where he 
had two successful years of coaching to his credit. 

Spring practice began the middle of April anil lasted until the close of school, 
The team was put through hard practice so that next year they could start right 
in on plays. We hope to see a fine squad turned out under Mr. Burbidge. 

To Mr. Keith a vote of thanks is due. It has been bis job to handle the 
financial side of our athletic program. This Is a real job and he has certainly done 
it well. 



I'age i in 



Gould Morrison 

Captain 




Football 



Page ill 



T <> II ER I 9 




Buck row: Bitlecki, Rude, Mutter, Crook, Watlin, O'Connefl. 

Second row. Wolfgnn, I'.-uilns, Penn, Brovrnsey, Schmidt, Micheels, Slaughter, Mgr. 

brant row: Kiibe, Kangaa, tfovascone, Morrison, Harmon, Fordhaia. 



Review of the Season 



T 



I IF. first game of the season opened at Winona where the Trainers locked horns 
with the Winona Teachers. It was a hard fought game, but weight and 
experience began to tell. After the final whistle- Stout Unwu\ itself at the. 
short end nf the- score, 12-0. 




The next week saw the Trainers tackle- the Terrible "Swedes" from Ouatavna 
Adolphus. This was Stout's first experience at night football. The team sat in a 
pouring rain for a half hour while the Gustaviis bojfl were rounded up from their 
dates and dumped into their oilskins; then the game started. The Trainers lu-lel 
them for three quarters, but what can eleven men do against forty: Schmidt, 
Fnrdhani, and all the- team fought hard; they had to; there was no he-]]) from tin- 
sidelines. After the men had rolled around in the mud for a couple of hours with no 
substitutions having been made, the game ended in another downpour of rain, 
( ,ict,i\ n.s winning .j I 0, 



7 o n i 




We took on I.a Crosse the following week. This was a disheartening game. 
With the kick-off 1 1 *< - Trainers carried the ball to the La Crosse goal line, but inex- 
perience and a blocked punt gave the La Crosse aggregation the lead. The whole 
game Bee sawed back and forth, La Crosse gradually forging ahead <>n the breaks 
to a score of 25-0. 

Lead by "Black Alphonse," River Palls' crashing fullback, the Red Men 
turned nark the Blue Devils to the tune 21-0. In plain English, the River Falls 
team was just too much for the weakened Stout team. Mac Morrison and Rude 
\v»r<- both out of this game on account of injuries. You know what happens to one 
whole side of the tine when those two men are out. O'Connell showed up great in 
that game. The team gave their best, but it could not stop the Red Men. River 
Falls had a great team and deserved the championship. 

The highly touted Superior aggregation came south to play us; they did. The 
first half ended as a toss-up, Superior holding a one point had. This was the first 
game the Trainers had played on their home field; so they fought all the harder. 
The student body backed them nobly, as this was the Homecoming game. The 
second hall began with the crowd and players at fever heat. 

The Trainers held up until the beginning of the last quarter, but the continual 
pounding by the Superior backfield began to tell. Superior took advantage of this 

and sent in mon fr.sh nun. The SCOW doesn't matter; it was somewhat lopsidrd : 

but the game was awarded to us on a forfeit, l to <>. It seems Superior wasn't very 
selective in picking its backfield. 

The Eau Claire game ended the season. This was the high light of the football 
si ason. Th<- two teams were evenly matched and fchey were old rivals. The game 
was hard fought from start to finish, first one side in the shadow of the goal, then 
the other. The whole tram played the game, eleven stars all outstanding. The 
whistle brought the scoreless game to a close. Twenty-two men walked slowly off 
tht field in the twilight as the curtains iviini down on the 1929 Football Season. 



Page 11$ 











4 * 











"SWEDE" FORDHAM 
This tras Fordham's first year 
on the squad. He has two more 
rears of conferi nee competition 
ahead of him and we look to see him 
as an all confi rence half b< tore he 
finishes here. Fordham played i» 
all the games as ■ regular and play 
d well. He is a good ball carrier 
and -i fine defence man. He will 
bear watching next season. 

KEITH PENS 
Penn held down the pivot posi- 
tion this season. Although he is a 
newcom* .• to Stout, he i> an old 
hand at the game, having played 
two years at North Dakota. There 
orere few plays that got through the 
•inter of the line when Penn was in 
he game. 

HANK- HARMON 
That great, big, strong, plunging 
fullback from Eau Galle! "Hank" 
«an really hack up a line of defence 

or carry the ball. < >n- could B 

tell when Harmon was in I 
tor there was always plenty of fight 
and pep. Hank lias two more 
ons and great |>ossibilitics ahead 
or him. 

FRANK SOVASCONE 
Frank played a tackle position. 
With Mac Morrison on one sid< oi 
the line and Sovascone on the other 
a coach has two men that Ik 
well be proud of. This is Novas- 
cone's last year at Stout, and we 
wish him success wherever he may 
go. 




CARL HOERNEMAN 
Hoerneman played quarterback 

and handled the tram fairly well. 
This was his Hr>t year on the regular 
squad and due to Micheels being 
hurt, the position was forced on 
him. Carl is a fast back and did 
some nice playing in all the games. 

"DEKE" S< HMIDT 

"Deke" was our utility man. play* 
inj- all positions equally well. Some 
of the time he was used in the hack 
field and Bometimes in the line. 
"Deke" didn't say much, but he was 
right there with the old fight. 

"RUSTY" WAI.I.IN 

"Rusty" was one of the wing men; 
he played end. At times he was 
called hack to do the passing or 
kicking. Wallin has one more 
season of conference football, so 
next year he will be back with us. 

JOHN RUDE 

A cleaner player, a better sports- 
man, and a harder fighter never 
played football for Stout. The 

gridatera exhibited their esteem of 
Rude by electing him captain of the 

team. Rude played cm! this 
m and ranked with the best in 

the conference. He baa one more 

rear of foothall. 



t o n 



' 






"BUD" MICHEELS 

"Bud" played quarter and proved 
to be a clever little ricld general. 
Early in the season he was out with 
an injured ankle; ><• he c 1 ■ < 1 not gel 

into ::!I <>t t!:- Although he 

was small in stature, he took a big 
part in every play. 



"RUGGED" KUBE 

Kube was a tower of strength on 
tin- offensive and also on the defen 
sive. N«>t many plays ever ran over 
his side of the line with any ap- 
preciable gain. Kube will be back 
with us next year to help form that 
winning t- 

"LU" PAULUS 

"Lu" is an all-around man; he 
did all the kiekinjr tor US this year, 

besides playing a great game at end. 

Lu was hurt early in the season. 
having several ril>s fractured, hut 

that didn't stop him. Alter a couple 
of weeks he was hack better than 

ever. This is Lu's third year. 

"TEDDY" BIELECK1 
Bielecki started out as center but 

was shifted to guard where he plaved 

•i good game. Bielecki played foot- 
hall here several seasons ago; now 

he is giving the VOUng8ter8 the rim- 
points on just how it is done. 










Mercury with his winged feet was 
no faster stepper than Brownsey. 
Brownsey played at half -mil there 
was no faster man on the field. 
Witli another season of experi< nee he 
will be as good •' ball carrier as any 
man thai lias ever ironc • > Stout. 



GORDON O'CONNELL 

O'Connell played ••> tackle or end 

position. In tin- River Falls game 
he showed up fine, smearing play 

after play. O'Connell has two jnore 
seasons of play. 



HARRY WOLFGRAM 

Wolfgram played u;:ard and plny- 
ed it well. This i> his second 
on tin squad; next s<:i>on lie will 

be back to form the nucleus for the 

new line. 



JEFF (HONK 

.left came up from last year's 

Freshman squad; by the end of the 
on was performing lik 1 a 

an. Cronk played guard and - 
ped many a nifty buck by just put- 

his weighl against the op* 

ponentS* line. Jeff has two more 

years of play. 







&~ 




















Our Cheer Leaders 

OUTSTANDING in tin- 1929-80 season of Stout's competitions are the three 
cheer Nadirs. The Rooter King for the year was Kill Gardiner, with liis 
two able assistants, Eddie Canatsey and Lawrence Sauter. These boys 
have shown real Stout fight and pep. They have been right there when it 
came to giving a yell. 

Kill Gardiner is a Junior who has been one of the cheer Leaders for the past 
three years. Lawrence Sauter tried his hand as a cheer leader this year for the 
first time. Some of his ideas at the basketball games brought a good laugh from 
the crowd. We hope he is back with us next year. Eddie Canatsey, the Frosh of 
the team, performed like a veteran. 

This year, for the first time, the school lias awarded the cheer leaders letters. 
All of them received letters for their good work. They've been a peppy bunch and 

we are proud of them. 



Pace nS 



Leon H 

Captain Elect 




Basket-Bali 















/{ / V 











Review of the 1930 Basket-Bail Season 

UNDER Coach Burbidge the Stout team developed into a nicely working quin- 
tet. The first game of the season opened here just after the Christmas holi- 
days. St. Paul Luther College met tin- Blue Devils at the Armory. Both of 
the two game series were long drawn-out affairs. There were only occasional 
hursts of speed. Stout drifted along, piling up a safe score; the final results of 
the two game series were 81-12 and v"> 24. 

The first conference game Opened with River Falls. The Falls men wire a 

little too fast for us; they won hoth games, •_'!> j i and 25 24. This game gave the 
students a chance to see the conference champs in action. 

Superior took a trip down to look over tin- Stout team. Superior was a smooth 
Working outfit, no taster than our men. hut their men seemed to have a better e\ e 

lor the basket. Perhaps Lady Luck helped them a bit. Burosj Haase, and Pordham 
played a great game for us that night. Buros played as though he had something 
against his home towners. The score gave them the games. 




Page /.»• 











Tin Superior guard played a game that reminded us a great deal <»f Greeley, 

our star guard of former years. 

I. a Cross»- came over and after a good look at us decided that tin- two game 

series was to he theirs. It was really a treat to sec them play. Their forward is 

on< of tii<- l»rst iu tin- Conference. From start to finish, they proved they could play 
real basketball. Tin- scores were 24-14 and :{:{-18. 

A week later we played Stevens Point. Both games were played out of town. 
The games were ours though the scores looked close. : > s 84 gave us a win. 

Our old traditional rivals from Kan Claire split the series with us. Kan Claire 

winning the first game, 27-24. Tin- first game was played there. Dodo Johnson 

wasn't here to promote his Special: so only a few of us saw that game. The ne\t 
Week-end EaU Claire came here. This was the grand finale of the season. The 
armory was packed with I'.au Claire and Stout rooters. From the starting whistle. 

it was nip ami tuck. Slowly Stout began to forge ahead hut couldn't hold for long. 
The half ended with a slight advantage for us. Coach Burbidge had things to 

say to the team during the half, for when they took the Hoor at the beginning of 
the second half they put all into the name. At the final whistle the score gave us 
the j;ame by a one point had. _' 1 '..'<>. 



- 
Page lit 









TOWER 19 3 




Burbidge, Johnson, Buros, Paulua, O'Connell, Micheels. 
Hanson, Peterson, Schaude, Fordham, Haase. 



The A Squad 



jj^f. 



THIS year's squad was composed of some fine players. Fordham. Haase, Bums, 
mil Peterson were the outstanding men. This is the Becond year tor both 
Haase and Fordham and the first year tor Burns mucI Peterson. Haase was 
elected captain of tlie '.'31 team. Peterson, our forward, was hurt in one of 
the early games: so lie didn't play in all the games. He had played three years for 
1 '.in Claire before he eame here. Cvengrns played a good game at center; it was 
very seldom that anyone ever got the jump on him. Johnson and Hanson were our 
star guards. Paul us. O'Connell, Micheels. and Schaude were regulars but did not 
play in all the games. Whenever they did get in, they showed a snappy brand of 
ball. 




TO W ER 19X0 




Coach Halveraoo, Schlumpfj J, Harmon, Southern, Aune, 
, Graff, Pierson, ll<.<-s«-r. McNaugfatoo. 



The B Squad 

COACH HALVK11SOVS B Squad had a very successful season, winning some 
five out of seven scheduled games. There is some very good material on this 
squad; next year we look to see them as regulars. Rowe and Hoeser were 
the outstanding forwards, and Pierson and McNaUghtOIl tin- guards. South- 
ern, Harmon, and Aune were men that could be relied upon at all times to com, 
through with their hest. Graff, the tall hoy from Chippewa, pkyed a nice grime at 
center. Schliimpf was the sub-forward. All of these men were out the whole sea- 
son and received their numerals. 




I J agc Mj 



ER 19 



\ 





BRAKER3 
EYE 0PENER5 




CURTI5 HOUSE 




7~ <* 



■ 




ww//////m\\\ \wmmm 







1NTKHKST in girls' athletics has heroine more pronounced during th<- past few 
years. Emphasis baa been placed on the importance <>t creating a sportsman 
Uke attitude and on stimulating "play for play's sake" rather than the develop- 
ment of a keen competitive spirit. 

Through the Women's Athletic Association, it has been made possible for girls 
to win a letter "S". Sinn- the reorganisation of women's athletics in the fall of 
1926, Frances [nenfeldt and Henrietta Quilling have been the first to win the "S". 
These girls were awarded the letter in their Sophomore year. In the spring of this 
year, the following irirls will also he given the "S ": Winifred Cooper, Marietta 
DeCramer, Georgia Aber, and Josephine Bdinger. All have been leaders in the 

VariOUS types of athletic activities, have been loyal and enthusiastic, and have shown 

B fine spirit of sportsmanship. 



I'age ij6 



TO 




Hack row. R, Hossman, I.. Hebl, V. Scblumpf. 

Front r,.:. ■: K. Eichorst, K. Rouler, A. Kelson, Captain, E. Schroeder. V. Gulw 



Flash-Ball 

THE Freshman class of 1980 won the class championship in the first athletic ac- 
tivity of the year for irirls. On Saturday morning of Homecoming, the 
Freshmen and Sophomores played a fast game to decide which team would 

play tor the championship. The I'rosh were victorious. The Juniors won 
from the Seniors and thus earned the right to play lor inter class championship. 

The teams playing for supremacy were evenly matched, as the tie score indicated. 
Another hard fought game was played and this time the Frosh were proclaimed the 
victors of flash-ball for l <»:{(). 

Memhers of the winning team were: A. Nelson, captain. M. Schroeder. R. 

ttossler. J. Lockhart, I.. Hebl, J. MOC, V. GutwaSSer, 1".. Schroeder. and V. 

Scblumpf. Subs: R. Hossman, V. Becktol. 

Sophomore team: K. Hansen, captain, M. Cress. (,. Quarters, I". Verbrick, 
K. Anderson, I.. Lamon. Subs: A. Ostrum, P. R. Kelley, C. McClurg, C. Kess, 

B. Murray. 

Junior team: .1. Edinger, captain. M. DeCramer. II. Quilling, G. Aher. P. 
Hill. M. Ilryz. E. Dinnies. M. Cranston, F. Inenfehlt. 

Senior team: W. Cooper, captain. R. I.indall. A. Win/., r. K. Counsel!, M. 

Green, I'.. Brevig. 















T o n ER 19 :i o 




\. \.l -Mil, K. HoHtnan. 

J. Foellcr, K. Rottkf, V. <".'.ltwagser, Captain, L. flebl. R. Zimmerman. 




Basket-Bail 



THK In sliiii.-in class won tin- inter-class championship in basket-ball M well as 
in flash-ball. The Freshmen and Sophomorr.s played a pood game from which 
the Frosh emerged as winners. Since the Seniors forfeited their chance for 
honor to the Juniors, the Freshmen played for first place. The Freshmen 
won a decisive victory nvcr the Juniors, and thereby captured the much desired 
championship. 

Several did particularly good work in basket-ball this year. 1.. Hebl was the 
outstanding scorer of the season. She made an individual total of 62 points. Cla- 
ry sse Ness and Alice Nelson were the next highest in basket shooting. Jean Moe, 
Alice Ostrom, and Mildred Haggard did splendid work in guarding. 

The members of the various teams were: 

Freshmen: V. Gutwass.r. captain, A. Nelson, L. Hebl, J. Moe, J. Lockhart, 
J. Foeller. Subs: R. Hossman. R. Zimmerman, R. Rossler. 

Sophomores: M. Anderson, captain, C. Ness. A, Ostruni, E. Anderson, M. 
Haggard. F. Verbrick. Subs: L. Hobart, E. Hansen, L, Andreassen, K. Graslie, G. 
Galloway. 

Juniors: M. BeCraim -r, captain. J. Kdinger, H. Quilling, G. Ahcr, F. Inen- 
feldt, F. Hill. Sub: M. Hryz. 

Seniors: R. Lindall, captain, W. Cooper, J. Hambh , M, Green, R, Dodge. M. 
Cranston, A, Lanekton. 



Page 12$ 



I HER 1930 




M. Haggard, f. \. 
Front rot". <".. Quarters, A. Ostrum, Captain, I*. K. Kelly, I-. Rdbart 



Swimming 



THE first place in tin- swimming meet was awarded to the Sophomore train. 
The class teams were scored on strokes, dives, relay races, a single rate', and 
underwater swimming. Individuals were judged for form on strokes and 
dives. The girl who made the highest number of points was awarded the 
diving girl "S." Alice Ostrum was the winner of this emblem. Those who were 
next highest in points were: Janet Evans, Adrlr Lam-kton, and Laura Andrrassi n. 
A smaller diving girl "S" was given to the member of each class team who had the 
highest number of points. Aliee Nelson won the emblem in the Freshman team, 
Henrietta (joiHin^ in the Junior team, and Adele La nek ton in tin- Senior team. 

Members of the swimming teams wire: 

Freshmen: I). Madden, captain, A. Nelson, V. Gutwasser, J. Moe, 

Sophomores: A, Ostrum, captain, J, Evans, O. Quarters, I.. Andreessen. Subs: 
P. R. Kelley, L. Hobart, K. Graalie. 

Juniors: F. Inenfeldt, captain, G. Aber, II. Quilling, E. Matthews. Sub: R. 
Lcavitt. 

Seniors: A. Lamkton. 




/ W KK / 9 .i 




te: M. J, Dodson, I.. M. Hiuon, A. Nelnn. 

V. GutwaaMr, ). Foellex, K. Peterson, Captain, I.. Hebl, R. Roaster. 



Volley-Bali 



THK I 'rcsliinari class again proved their athletic superiority by winning the 
volley-hall inter-clasa championship. This class team won an easy victory 
over the Sophomore team. The Juniors also easily won the Junior-Senior 
game. The Freshman and Junior teams wen more evenly matched hut at 
the end of two games, the Freshmen were on the top. 

The Freshman class of this year will have its name, engraved on the .silver lov- 
ing cup which has been given hv the W. A. A. to the class winning the majority of 
athletic events. 

Members of the class volley-ball teams were: 

Freshmen: E. Peterson. Captain, J. Lockhart. V. Gutwasser. A. Nelson, R. 
Rossler, J. Foeller, M. J. Dodson. Subs.. L. Hehl, 1.. M. Huson. I.. Vergin. 



Sophomores: It. Olson, Captain, L. Lamon, A. Aides, M. Haggard, C. Ness, 
E. Hansen, A. Ostrum. Subs., G. Quarters, F. Verhrick, G. Galloway. 

Juniors: C. McClurg. Captain, II . Quilling, F. Inenfeldt, M. 1)e Cramer, F. 
Hill, M. Hrys. Sub., H. Koss. 

Seniors: M. Fox, Captain, H. Ilasmussen, A. Mor, J. Harnhly. J. Hansen, V. 
Parsons. 







^MBSSKMIUIf/IS 





mmsmin i i iwrrsikrb 




Y/////////////////s 



onr\ecomino 









Well, Here We Are 



September 






9. Everyone here some ready for work — some ready for play. 

10. Got our hooks — they had pretty covers, hut tin- pictures wire few and unin- 
teresting. 

Freshman men get introduction to horse tank on Main Street. 

11. As tli*- weiners w.tc captured by tin- coeds — so were tin- men's hearts at the all 

school picnic. 

Frosh turn out in hrijrht irr< en taps. 

12. Mad scrainhle tor scats in Assembly. A t'« w got in tin- WTOttg pew. 
11. S. S. A. Mixer Dane.. 

"Where's that fellow I met at the picnic?" 

16. Frosh strinic green flay; between I. A. and II. K. Building. Mr. Antrim, watch- 
ing from the library window, was afraid that they'd fall. 

17. Tin- Stout Tumhlers organized with the slogan, "Bigger and Better Tumhles." 

18. Frosh salute Soph flag; under Harmon's supervision, none escaped nor tried 
to. 

20. Our first game of Football. Every player had a chance to show his stuff. 

23. Frosfa girls are initiated. 

"Roses an red 
Violets are blue, 
We're crazy for class. 

But that class isn't you." 
2">. Tin- Stout Hand was "tuned up" with a large turn out. 
26. Glenn Lockwood Came to Modern History class on time. 

28. Not used to playing night football names, the players each carried a candle 

when they played Gustavus Adolphus at St. Peter. 
80. Mr. Good reported "no throat irritations" in first meeting of Men's Glee Club. 



7 



Pot* '34 







Fight, Stout, Fight! 



October 



_'. "True to type", the Stout Typographical Society met. 

:{. Now we can "lay down the law," since it has been explained to us by •'. I). 
Millar, Representative En the State Legislature. 

■">. Beulah Todd was quiet till «■ i -r 1 1 1 o'clock this Sunday morning. Miracles bap- 
pen even now in Lynwood Hall. 

<;. Men wenl to Men's Mixer Dance to meet their fellowmen. 

7. "Had your physical < \ain yet?" 

"How's your heart beating?" 

!'. Lisle Huson dreamily saying at tour o'clock in the morning, "Matter is com- 
posed of minute particles." 

10. Everyone was out taking a walk En the sunshine after hearing Dr. Harring 
ton's address. Even Charley Strong decided that he had better start drinking 

milk. 

11. Dr. Frost of the University of Wisconsin talks to the Stout Science Club. 

12. Many students went to see game at River Falls. 

19. Rifle Club members got shot. 

23. Some of the -;irls got excited, because they saw Canatscy carrying a Buitcase 
and thought that he was leaving. They were also wondering whether Santa 
Claus came early and gave Carl Koll his doll, hut heaved a sigh of relief 

when tiny were informed that this was being done for S. T. S. initiation. 

■_M. Emma Anderson, Violet Walstrom, and Margaret Senty bicycled to Elk 

Mound. 

•_•»;. Superior playa football h<r<-. Some are going without desserts to pay beta 

made. 

28. Medical exams an- over. Because it is Monday, let us hope that our health 

defects will all COme out in the wash. 

.'!•. What Society are you being rushed for? 

.;<>. Everybody busy decorating and preparing tor Homecoming. 






Pate 135 




- roun< 







enomome 





iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 




Page ijfi 




l\ 





a 



•1 
wit 




s 







Page t& 







Oh, You Tacky Drag 

November 







1. Old Grada returned to Alma Mater. 

"Is married life 1 ik.<- that?" was the question being asked by the students, 
after seeing "The Family I pstairs." 

2. At the Pep Assembly ill students showed their love for Stout, and the words. 
"Beat Eau Claire", rent the air. 

To the tune o the Hand the Homecoming Parade marched to the Football 

field, Where the blue and white fought the greatest liattle of the year. 
After a sumptuous banquet, the elimax eame with the Victory Dance. 

3. Old Gradfl migrated to respective positions and "lived in memory" of the hap 

py events. 

■I. Back t<» classes, in body, but not in thought. 

5. "Y" not belong to the "Y": slogan of V. M. ('. A. 

7. "Why the smiles, students"-" 

"Teachers went to Milwaukee Convention." 

8. Everyone danced in glee 'it the Glee Club Dance. 

10. End of First Quarter. Several students received imitation to Deans' offices. 

No refreshments were served. 
14. Mr. Curran gave us the history of The Stout Institute. Our job is to make 

the future history. 
1."). The Woodworkers' class took a trip to Beloit The jewelry stores proved 

quite appealing to Tom Nelson. 

16. If you can't believe that college students can act like kids, you should have 
come to the Kid Party. 

17. "I hereby promise" was faithfully repeated by thirty Freshman jjirls. No. 
they didn't all get married, just formally pledged into their respective So- 
cieties. 

20. "Y's" had a joint meeting. Tin' answer was a success. 

21. Tin- A Capella Choir wasn't a Hat tire, even if it did have one coining over from 
EaU Claire. 

Sid Cotton thought the yirl who played the piano cutest. 

22. Tin- DcMolax boys gave their turkey a treat by taking him to their dance he 
before bestowing tin- final death blow. 

24. Believe it or not. "A Song Without Words" was sim^r l.y tin- Nordix Quartet 
2*). No war paint present as irirls bury hatchet at Inter Society meeting. 
■_>7. Day before vacation. Will it never end? Reuben Hagen even stayed awake 
during Kd. Pro. class. 









Page i# 







Home to a Merry Christ mas 

December 

•_'. Students and janitors return t<> school. Bowman and Welch leave tor New 

Orleans. 
8. Totally awake to the fact that we really are back it school. 

1. The reason "H.izv" Taiit'man came to I. it. Survey class late was that lie let 

.ill the girls go into the elevator first. 
7. Many limp home from first dancing class. 

V. Son., of the l'rosh are all packed rea.lv to go home. Janet Hohertsoji DOUght 
an extra suitcase. 
18. Ellen Nelson, at first football game: "Guess I'll go home. This is no place 

tor a jjirl who wants to reduce, with everyone yelling 'Stout'." 
20. The main question for discussion i». "What train are you leaving tor home on, 

and where do you live?" 

THE STUDENT'S FAREWELL 
My bag is packed, my ticket's bought; 

There isn't a thing that I've forgot; 
My hooks are closed, my mind is numh ; 
I'm homeward hound, and going some. 

The last three Weeks of the twenty-seven 
I'm going to Spend in a little heaven: 
The wind may hlow. the snow may fall. 

But I'm not going to care at all. 

I've bid my teachers all goodbye 

Without a teardrop in my eve: 

I've wished them all a Christmas merry 
And all the good luck they could carry. 

They sent me off with do good word. 

For all they COuld say Was: "School starts the third!" 
Hut th.s< cold words just rolled rijrht off. 
And a cheery farewell I waved my prof. 

I am now at the depot, awaiting my train: 

So goodbye, folks' I'll 1..- hack again. 

CilltlsTV 






Pat* *Y) 








i 






us 






e 








M 





■ 







OICS o 

a 




eccer 







Page Hi 



/ 9 




The Girls Ask Us t<> Dance 



January 




7. '"In dreams again we Bee 
Visions of vacation days 
That used to be." 

!•. Students wishing they were magicians so they could apply some of the tricks 
in writing exams. 

10. "Wonder if my picture is in the Exhibit Case in Dean Bowman's Office?" 
is the interesting question now. 

18, Sid Heath faints when be finds schedule f»>r final exams posted. 

iv. The tables arc turned: Instead of the girls asking each other. "Have yon a 
bid for the Formal?" the men are asking it. 

k>. Farewell-Welcome Banquet in honor of Paulus and Burbidge. Many of the 

girls attended for more reasons than one. 
1?. Term papers and notebooks are the chief occupation of the week end. 
'20. Have you been vaccinated for smallpox? 

22. Hitters, entering American Government class: 'This is the last time I ha\c to 

g0 to this class, if I don't Hunk." 
_':;. •'What do you spose shell ;isk us in the final?" asked (larysse MeSS. 

"Everything we don't know." replied Mildred Haggard. 
2 1. A Winter Palace was treated by the Society <;irls for the Mid winter Formal. 

Sone of the icicles melted in their hands. 

!'.">. Everybody singing: "It's over, all over." "Until next semester/' chimed in a 

Frosh. 
26. 'I'h.- Winter Palace becomes the seem- of the Mid-winter Formal staged by the 

Society Ltirls. 
28. What's an easy course to take this semester? No use registering for ;i hard 

subject. 

30. Kinjrslcy speaks on Negro Problem. "Charleston" was so interested that he 

attended all three meetings. 
81. Midler will wear crown the night of the Junior Prom. 







The Ice Invite* U* 



February 

l. The fact that there is "no place like Stout" is sanctioned by the return of many 
former Btudents. 

7. Serving Bandwiches in the library has been one of the new ideas propounded 
by Carol McClurg. Al Poellinger maintains that they arc conducive to bet- 
ter studying. 

10. Do not criticise some nun if by force of habit they stop in front of Lynwood's 
door a moment before entering, next year. 

12. Students anxiously await letters from home to learn their marks. 
1.5. Darwin's missing link found the night of The Tacky Drag. 

16. The school agrees that the Prosh aren't so green after seeing the program that 

they put on in Assembly. The Sophs claim this was due to their i.arly train- 

ing and influence. 
18. Physiology class is busy looking in \Vho*s Who for an appropriate name for 

its eats. 
22. Stout pointed the Pointers to defeat in the basketball game here. 
28. "The Old Grouch" won second in District Dramatic Contest. 









?g 



1 







"iac 




m™ 



■ 



1 9 




S at the dirts' Swimming Meet 



March 









2. "Did you see what I got at the Fire Sale?" 
». Stout gains A-l Teachers ( < » 1 1 « - u - ratinir. 

6. Printers make trip to Cities. Some events reported; others withheld. 

7. "Revenge is sweet," say the Stout students after the Eau Claire basket ball 
game. 

8. Dusty starts season with a roller-skating trip to Ban Claire. 

Men make plans for De Molay Formal. 
Girls plan trips to Eau Claire and Cities. 

18. All those interested in wild lit«- of the proper sort attended the lecture on the 

Pinehot South Sea Cruise-. 

16. Altliougb it is fashionable to be feminine, many of the girls still have 
for bowling. 

21. "In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love," and 
a young lady's to poetry. Helen Novak celebrated the first day of spring by 
writing another poem. 

22. The first days of Spring are ushered in by the De Molay Formal Dance. 

20. The French chef proved very interesting to many of the girls. We still have 
as a remembrance his name written in our Cook Hooks. 

27. Dr. H. E. Vaughn was a guest of The Science Club. He spoke on Plant 
Diseases. 

28. The Philo basket-ball team won the Inter Society ehampionship. 






Page n6 



TOWER IV 




April Shotcert Bring Man Flo\ 



April 



i. What Society's members will drink from the Loving Cup presented by the 
V. M . C. A. on Stunt night? 

.">. Men's Glee Club start tour by going t«> Elk Mound. 

12. Tln\ week end we .-ill do our Easter shopping. 

18. Easter vacation. Several students got up early so that they would ha' 
longer day. 

20. Edna Langsetfa woke up earlj and went to see if the Easter Bunny had come 

to visit the Annex. 

25. Girls' Olee Club Concert. 

26. The Gym was transformed into ••» modernistic palace the night of the Junior 
Prom. Manv former students returned to celebrate this occasion. 










- 














Pat* 119 




Mai/ I We Have Go vith You 



May 



1. S. S. A. Officers are elected. 

2. "Quality Street" was a play of quality presented by the M. A. P.'s under the 
able direction of Miss Eiassler. 

;>. The Intra. Mural games which provided so much interest and competition have 
closed a Bucces tson. 

it. "Three years from now. I'll be wearing a cap and a "own." says tin- Frosh as 
in looks with awe and reverence upon a passing Senior. 

1J>. The Tower Staff, after 8 year Of bard but enjoyable work, celebrated the pro- 
duction of the first Junior Tower. 

28. Girls give farewell breakfast to Senior girls. 

•_'".. Baccalaureate Address. 

May Day Festivities, 
The crowning of the Q 

A school picnic afterwards. 
A joyous day supreme. 

28. Seniors demonstrate their ability t<> act by presenting the Commencement Play, 
in which they publicly say their farewell. 

■J'.>. The notes of farewell and "Until 1 Bee you again" arc heard as the Seniors 
Bay good bye to their Alma Mater and join the vast numbers who are striving 
to "Promote Learning, Industry. Skill, and Honor." 



- 

Page ISO 



The Student's Lament 



Pitter patter, pitter patter, 
On my window pane, 
Pitter patter, pitter patter, 
Falls the warm spring rain. 



Winter's dying, birds are flying 

To the north again, 

Grass is growing, streams are flowing, 

Winter's grip begins to wane. 

Hurry scurry, hurry scurry. 
In the woodland brake, 

Hurry scurry, hurry scurry. 
Woodland folk have homes to make. 



Spring is coming, folks are humming, 
Everyone is gay, 

Skies are bluer, troubles fewer. 
When comes the 29th of May. 

Books and worry, hooks and worry. 

Will bother us no more. 

Stop and wonder, stop and \vond< r 

What we came to college for. 
People hiking, big trout striking 

In a shady pool. 

Then September says, "Remember, 

Time to pack and hike to school.'* 





























Pate i$i 




<*Hmt 1 



Page 153 



TO ' 








i'*t* '55 




^>\ 



7 9 3 



Memories 

There's a group of buildings on the shorts of a lake 

Where memory lingers yet, 
That has made me friends I shall never forsake; 

I wonder if they will forget. 



How dearly my vision recalls the time 
When I was a freshman at Stout. 

Rollicking -ray with t Jn>^« friends of mine 

Who in trouble or joy were always about. 



But — now that I'm old and can picture things 
That we did in our carefree years, 

Th.- time slips away on hasting wings 
And another picture appears. 

I see them all as old as I. 

Thinking perhaps of the past. 
Of how far apart our paths have lain 
Since we saw each other last. 

I wonder it fate will ever decree 

That our paths shall cross once more, 

If still the same pals we then shall he. 

As we were on Menomin's shore. 
oh. just to spend my youth again 

Among those friends of old. 
To do the things that we did then 

Cannot he purchased with mere gold. 



I love to sit by my fireplace 

And stat my friends all ahout. 
And imagine I see each smiling face 

That is framed in mv memorv of Stout. 




m 



My pipe is out. and the firelight 

Has lost its ruddy glow, 
And I hid my friends a reluctant good night 
As from my dreams they go. 

— E. C. 



Pas c ijt 



9&mmmiii/JWM8m 




mwMiinm 



St 




7 o n i 1 



The Menomonie Section 



THIS section of the Tower is the result of the efforts of the Menomonie busi- 
ness men who, of their belief in the worth of our school, have given 
l>otli financial and co-operative aid in the publishing of this hook. We feel 
thai thi> section of materia] is a material asset to the hook. The cuts which 
appear on the following pages are scenes of the city and some of its business 
houses, its library, country club, and city hospital. The following business houses 
are Tower boosters, and we wish to thank them for rendering such appreciated serv- 
ice. 






American Bakery Matt rials Company 
S. K. Andreessen, I). V. S. 

Nels Arislms. Jeweler 

S. Brace, D.D. S. 

Badger State Lumber Company 

Bailey Insurance Agency 

Bank of Menomonie 

Hern Chevrolet Company 

Belair Studio 

Broadway Barber Shop 

Broadway Meat Market 

A. K. Bryant, I). V. S. 

Boothby Print Shop 

Boston Drug Store 

Carter Ice and Fuel Company 

Chase ami Wagner 

City Bus •■Hid Baggag< 

< I . (lark. I). I). S. 

F. A. (lark. Attorney 

( Hear Oil Station 

Commercial Club 
Crescent Creamery 
John Duesing, Insurance 

Diedrich Harness Shop 

EaU Claire Press 

Eskay Company 

Kvans Tohin. Clothiers 
l.xcclsor Brick 

Farmers' Equipment Company 

Farmers' Store Company, (ien'l MiKe. 

Flick Auto Company 

First National Hank 

Fuller Auto Company 

Dr. Fuller 



Gamble Auto Supply Company 

Golden Huh-. Variety Store 
Goodrich Furniture Company 

Graven and Wilcox 

(ins Galematus 

Hasse's Apparel Shop 

Harry Halberg, Painting and De< 

tog 
Hanson Tire Shop 

W. W. Harrington, I). D. S. 

Hamerly Stone Works 
Dr. A. F. Heisfog 

A. F. Herrem, Tailor 

Hendrickson Shoe Store 

V. A. Hosford, Electric Shop 

Hotel Marion. Nick Jeatran. Prop. 

Huber Billiard Parlor 
Hudson-Ess* t 

Ingraham Insurance Company 
[ngraham Brothers and Torrey, 
Jewelers 

Junck Hardware 
Keller Blacksmith Shop 
Kern's Restaurant 

Kraft State Bank 

C. T. Kyle. Osteopath 

Lammer's Grocery 
Lakeview Barber Shop 

Drug Store 
Oh- Madsen, Jeweler 

Menomonie Auto Company 

Menomonie Banking Company 
Menomonie Clinic 

Menomonie Dve House 



Page 158 



7 O W E R 



The Menomonie Section-Continued 



Menomonie Greenhouse 
Menomonie Grocery 
Menomonie Nash Company 

McClelland Service 
John Meyer, Tailor 
Mode] Flour Company 
Montgomery Ward 

C. J. Mowers. Grocery 
Mylady s Shoppe 

I. W. NrsMT. Barber 

Northwest Finance Company 

Northern States Power Company 

A. R. Olson, Art Store 

Bye Oleson 

Olympia 

O. .-mil N. Lumber Company 

Peerless Grill 
Carl B. Peterson 

('. A. Pinkepank, Grocer 

R. Randall, Service Station 

Railway Express, Robert Taufman 
Recreation Parlors 
Richardson and Richardson, 
Chiropractors 

Rudiger Radio Shop 

A. & P. Tea Company 
A. J. Josephson 
Menomonie Bakcrv 



II . W. Rudow 

Russell Pastry Shop 

Drs. Steves, Halgren and Long 

Swenson and Berndt, Shoes 

August Schaenoff, Plumbing 

Charles Stone 
Smoke Shop 

J. E. Sleeper 

Smith Brothers, Orpheum and Grand 

Theatres 
A. Summerfield, Men's and Ladies' 

Clothes 

Se\«r Sommervold 
I [ugh Searles, Garage 
Hans Swenby, Furniture 
Schnieder Brothers, Meats 
Shaker Studio 
Vanity Beauty Parlor 

Dr. Vanek 

Volp's Grocery 

Wherle Shopp,- 

Williams Brothers, Hardware 
Wisconsin Hydro-Electric Company 
Wisconsin Milling Company 
George Yount. Insurance 
Dunn County Sews 

Kreiser's Beauty Shop 












T O W EH 19 3 



The Menomonie Commercial Club 




OF all the civic groups dedicated to the advancement of the city's commu- 
nity interests the Menomonie Commercial Club .stands front and foremost 
in this line of endeavor. Its liistory reveals a long train of accomplish- 
ments in this particular in tin twenty-five years that it has been an active 
force' fur the betterment of the industrial and business life of the community. 

Tin Menomonie Commercial Club eamc into being in 19Q;>. It was fathered 
by Senator James H, Stout, who foresaw the mid of a civic group of this nature 
as an agency through which the civic needs of the city could find expression and 
supply the machinery for action that would bring about improved conditions and 
contribute to the betterment of Menomonie. Senator Stout was its first president 
and continued to take a keen interest in the organization until his death. 

No other factor bftfl done more to create a feeling of fellowship among the 
business men of Menomonie than the Commercial Club. It lias brought new in- 
dustries to Menomonie. It has done much to help those that were already here. 
It is on the constant lookout for factories that will add to the industrial prestige of 

the city. 

The Commercial Club was instrumental in getting a new Omaha depot for 
Menomonie in 1905 and about four years ago helped in a realization of the project 
to abandon the old Milwaukee depot and have a modern depot on another site. It 
has been a leader in furthering highway development of Dunn county, with the 
result that its well-direeted efforts have brought about a marvelous improvement in 
road transportation facilities, making Dunn county one of the outstanding counties 
in this part of the state in this respect. 

Tin- Menomonie Commercial flub has done much to bring about a community 

of interest between the town and country people. Following along this line the 
elub has been consistently back of the development of the community as a dairy 
center. As a result Dunn county ranks as one of tin- top counties of the state in 
l.utterl'at production. The club sees a still greater future for the dairy industry 
here and is constantly on the alert to enlist the help of any agencies that will en- 
hance this development. 

The Commercial Club was tin- impelling force that eventually cleared the city's 
business streets of telephone and electric wires and has been bark of several paving 
projects that have resulted in permanent street improvements. 

Summer band concerts every week in Wilson park, where thousands of people 
from town and country gather on Tuesday evenings, were the direct result of the 
interest and activity of the Commercial Club. Movements that have meant much 
in raising the standard of the community's health have always been ardmtly pushed 
by the Commercial Club. The elub has an ever-lengthening list of such projects 
to its credit, including advertising the city's advantages, investigation of tin re- 
sources of Menomonie and surrounding territory and other useful work in the pro- 
motion of public welfare i. 

The business affairs of the club are manned by a directorate of eleven, drawn 
from the business and professional held of the city, and the elub personnel is com- 
prehensive with a membership of more than one hundred and fifty. Gilbert Nerby. 
Menomonie manager of the Northern States Power Company, is president of the 
group and through his guidance the elub is living up to its traditions of achieve- 
ments in making Menomonie' a more 1 inviting place in which to live, a community 
that has a forward attitude that keeps pace with the rapid changes in the business 
and industrial field of today. 

To the Commercial Club, Menomonie owes much, because the Commercial Club 
lias done much for Menomonie. 



Page 160 



T O W K H I 9 




Menomonic 

THE late Senator James H. Stout, lumberman, pioneer in education, and prom 
inent citizen <»f Mcnomonie, was the founder of the famous school thai car 
rics his name. Mr. Stout was a man of far vision and philanthropic tcndcn 
cies. He had an intense and generous interest in the welfare of humanity. 
He loved the boys and girls and they loved ami admired him. It may be said thai 
his later life was diligently devoted to the unfolding of an idea that had for its 
purpose the practical braining of the mind and hand of the young people. 

The school had its beginning in 1890 in a small way and from that time until 

his d.ath iu 1910 Mr. Stout's educational activities grew in interest and widened 

in scope with the development of The Stout Institute. 

Mr. Stout's efforts in the Bervice of education brought him to the front in a 

conspicuous way in Wisconsin, and as th< school grew his work came into national 

prominence. 

\o sketch of his life in brief space can do justice to the man and his service 

to humanity. He gave unsparingly, unselfishly of his time, thought, and monej 

to the upbuilding of tin school that he had conceived for the "promotion of learn 
ing, skill, industry, and honor.'' 

Mcnomonie, home of Tin Stout Institute, claims marked advantages from many 
viewpoints. \ot only is it known throughout the Country as a city of educational 
initiative, but it is commanding increasing attention for other excellent reasons. 
It is noted as a city of good homes, a city ahout which revolves the lives of a rich 

progressive, and promising agricultural community; tin- center of almost unlimited 

Water power, developed and undeveloped; a city which holds forth exceptional 
prospects to the manufacturer; favored with splendid transportation facilities, i' 
invites the attention of those interested in distribution: located on the hanks of the 
Hxl Cedar River and Lake Menomin and surrounded by a beautiful country in 



V 



Page 161 






T OU l 1 9 







which abound streams that are well stocked with fish, it is in the heart of a para 
disc for tin disciples of [zaak Walton, while the fertile prairies and restful val 
leys within easy distance are a lure alike to the home seeker and the tourist. 

Among the industries which support tliis thriving community, agriculture must 
l>« accorded first position. Originally a part of the great timber district and the 
seat of the operations of the famous Knapp, Stout and Company, lumber manu 
facturers, Dunn County has gradually evolved into one of the richest farming arias 
in Northern Wisconsin. Dairying is the line of farming that is most favored and 
a tour through the districts contiguous to Menomonic invariably surprises the trav 
eler by the character of the farm homes which it reveals, Wisconsin is known as 
the greatest dairy state in the Union ami Dunn County ranks among the highest 
of the seventy one countit > oi the state in the output of butter. All of the cattli 
in Dunn County have been tested for tuberculosis by the State of Wisconsin. Milk 
that is produced by healthy cows has a greater value and is safer for children. 
unities that have had their cattle tested sell at a higher price on the 
market. 

While Menomonic is essentially an agricultural community as a center of a 
rich dairy section, dotted with flourishing creameries and cheese factories, it 
splendid representation along industrial lines. Prominent in the industries arc 
three large brickyards, tapping inexhaustible beds of finest clay. The Hour indus- 
try likewise commands especial attention. Products of these industries go to all 

parts of the world. One of the largest manufacturers of hardwood lumber in tin 
state has its headquarters in Menomonic as does also one of the large chains of 
lumber yards. A piano factory, nurseries, and greenhouses, cigar factori> s. metal 

works, and dairy enterprises, including several larg< creameries, diets, factories. 

and a eondeiis. ry contribute to a liberal payroll for Menomoni, workmen. 

Menomonie's retail facilities provide an exceptional service. The city is a 
trade center for a large area, attracting shoppers for miles around hy the com- 
plete, up-to-date, and high quality stocks of goods. Wholesale establishments arc 
also well represented. 



7 









:* o 




Strong, growing banks form a vital ]>.-irt of the business life of Menomonie 
and provide complete financial facilities for the needs of the community. The <!<■ 
posits in these banks will aggregate about $7,000,000. 

The City of Menomonie is under tin- Commission Form of Government, g<>s 
ernmental affairs being in the hands of a mayor and two councilmen. How well 
th.- people ar<- satisfied with this system was indicated in tin- fall of 1920, when 
by an overwhelming vote the electors decided not to return to the old aldermanic 

form. Th.- dty has several miles of well paved streets, a fine white way system 
in tin- business district, and many imposing public ami private buildings which gaVI 

the place a metropolitan aspect. Among the public buildings may he mentioned 
the commanding structures which form the home of The Stout Institute, a Federal 
Building, a Masonic Temple, County Court House. City Hall, and tin- Mabel 
Taint, r Memorial, a beautiful stone edifice presented to the city about thirty years 
ago by the late (apt. Andrew Tainter, which contains ;1 completely equipped thea 

tre. public library, rooms lor the (i. A. It., and W. It. C, amusement room, and 

dining rooms available for public use. 

Menomonie has several fraternal organizations with large, active memberships. 
Among them is Hostord chase Post No. :{•_'. the American Legion, which in con- 
junction with its auxiliary unit, maintains cluh rooms, where visiting Legionnaires 

are always welcome. 

Within the city arc a number of musical groups, including the famous I.uding- 
ton Guard Hand, one of the hest in the state, which has hecn in existence for many 
vears. The summer concerts given On Tuesdaj evenings by this hand from their 

shell in Wilson Park draw thousands of people from the surrounding country. 

The city maintains a fine public hospital at which the charges arc mad- as 

reasonable »s possible. It owns several parks, in addition to which an- a beautiful 

parkway along the lake front, another along Wilson Creek Boul< -card, and Other 
pleasure grounds along the lake and streams, owned and controlled hy the Menom 

onic Improvement Association. 






Page 16J 






!? 




The Menomonie Country Club enjoys a splendid nine hole golf course of in- 
comparable beauty. Situated one mile from the city, on Federal Highways 10 and 
12 and State Highway 79, on the banks of Wilson Creek, the location is ideal. 
Par for the nine holes is :w>. The Club House is provided with dressing and loung 

illg rooms for the men and women, showers, a pro and eaddy room, a well equip- 
ped kitchen, a large dam- and dining hall. The Country Club is available lor use 

!>\ \isitors in Menomonie, and students of the summer sehool of The Stout Insti 
tute have the privilege of its 086 through arrangements with the sehool authorities. 

The spiritual requirements of the community are provided for by several 
churches. The Congregational, Roman Catholic, two German Lutheran. Bpisco 
pal. Methodist Episcopal, Baptist, Norwegian Lutheran, and Evangelical Associa 
tion groups have substantial church homes. Several have commodious parsonages. 

The pastors are men of ability and the auxiliary organizations reach out into the 

community life in a way to greatly extend the ehureh Influence. 

A sehool nurse is regularly employed in connection with the public schools 

so that, with the health and poor departments of the eity government, tile needs oi 

th«- people in these respects are well provided for. 

By its last eensiis. Menomonie has a population of .">.10l. hut in appearam. 

enterprise, and business activity it is ahead of most cities of its size. 

Its position as eounty seat of Dunn County makes it the official as well as 

the geographical and commercial center of the eounty. A circumstance which il- 
lustrates the importance of the eity in relation to the surrounding country is the 
faet that ten rural free delivery routes emanate from tin- Menomonie postoffice, a 

number larger than that of any other eounty seat in Wisconsin. 



rage i'4 







Representing the commercial, industrial, civic, and social life <>f t !■«- commu- 
nity is the Bienomonie Commercial Club, an active body of citizens whose endeavor 
i> ti» make Menomonie a better city in tin- four lines indicated. The club is ever 
alert to welcome the newcomer and an interest in which it prides itself is that of 
seeing that afenomonie i> known as "the city of a square deal.'* 

Menoinonie is easily accessible to the motorist. The city is located on five 

Federal or State trunk highways. Federals 10 and 12 run diagonally across Wis 

cousin, forming a direct artery from Menomonie to southern Wisconsin and Chi 

cago and a direct route to Manitowoc. Highways '-' B and 7!' run north and south 
and 29 east and west, providing a center for a network of important highways that 
make it convenient for the motorist to reach Menoinonie. Located ahout sixty 
sewn miles east of St. Paul, the city is reached by two important railway s\ steins, 
the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha comprising part of the North- 
western system) and the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway. Motor husses 
operate frequently on Highways I" and 12. 



The Hotel Marion offers resident guests and the traveling public modem SC 
commodations. Fifty-two rooms comprise the capacity of the new hotel; all have 
running water, telephone, and other modern appointments, while a large numher 
are provided with private hath. (iood accommodations are also available at the 
Central House and other hotels. 









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/ H I 9 



• 














The Public Schools 

Emerson said, "Every great institution is the lengthening shadow of ■ great 
man." The truth of Emerson's statement is well illustrated here in Mcnomonic. 
Because of Senator Stout's position on the Hoard of Education of the Menomonie 
Public Schools, the shadow took shape and grew into the present Stout Institute 

Ii was to the Public Schools that Senator Stout first turned his attention and it was 

in them that many of his progressive ideas were worked out. There is still reflect- 
ed in the Public Schools much of the early progress which was developed when 
ideas new in educational thought were put into practice here. 

The schools are organised along the lines suggested by the best modem prac- 
tice into the senior high school, a junior high school, the intermediate and elcmen 
tarv grades, and kindergarten. The senior high school comprises the l»)th. 11th. 
and 1 2th grades and lias ahout 802 students. The junior high school comprises the 
7th. 8th, and 9th grades and has ahout 802 students. 

As proof of the quality of the high BChool work we point to the fact that the 
school is on the accredited list of the North Central Association of Colleges. This 

rating allows its graduates to enter without examination any college or university 
in the eighteen states comprising the Association. 



Pagt '66 






i< I <> 




K 






On the whole Menomonie Public Schools are ■ decided credit to the city. They 
could be better schools; in fact, a virile public sentiment will make them better 

Schools each year. The spirit of Senator Stout still liv s in the hearts of Menomonie 
citizens. And always their public schools will spell to their hoys ami irirls the one 
big American word. Opportunity. 

Menomonie also has several other schools, including the school of the St. Paul's 
Lutheran congrtgation ami that of the St. Joseph's parish. The former represents 

a Congregation Consisting of some three hundred families; tin- latter has a school 

enrollment varying between no and rj"> pupils. 

Tin- Dunn County School huildinu is located in Menomonie. This houses the 
Rural Normal School and the county agricultural school. 

The Rural Normal School was one of the first to hi- opened in Wisconsin, hav- 
ing been started in September, 1899. Since September, 1924, it has had the Row- 
man Model School, which furnishes adequate opportunity for demonstration of 

methods and for practice teaching. 

Tin- Dunn County School of Agriculture and Domestic Kconomy has several 
huildinirs adjacent to the main building. A four year course in Agriculture and a 
tour year course in Domestic Kconomy arc offend. Several other shorter courses 
are also availahh . Active extension work is carried out along many lines through 

th. country. 












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/ o n a: h 



i 9 



Thank You 

In behalf of the Junior Class, members of the staff of the 1930 Tower 
wish to express their appreciation for the co-operation given them in making the 

publication of this book possible. To the advisers and fatuity whose interest and 

counsel was ever at hand; to the student body whose timelv response to every re- 
quest was an indication of true spirit: to the advertisers whose willingness to aid 

US was prompt and wholt li« arted j to tin- townspeople whose interest supplied our 

historical theme, we express our sincere thanks. 



m 






The engravings for this book were made by the 
Hi ckbee Mbars Company 

of Saint Paid. Minnesota. 
The book was printed by the 

M. Gill W miner Company 

ot Saint Paul, Minnesota. 



7 



Peg* ra